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9 Winter Window Box Ideas

Boost curb appeal this season with these winter window box ideas including festive greenery, hardy flowers and bright holiday accents.

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Seasonal Window Boxes With Red Twig Dogwood, Douglas Fir, Winterberry, Arborvitae, Blueberry Cedar, And Pine Conescourtesy @phillygarden/instagram

Layers of Height

Add drama to your window boxes with layers of plants in varying heights and textures. More is more with window flower boxes! This example by @phillygarden features red twig dogwood, Douglas fir, winter berry, arborvitae, blueberry cedar and pine cones.

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Magnolia Window Boxcourtesy @billywelcher/instagram

Classic Magnolia

Magnolia leaves are often featured in holiday wreaths and centerpieces, making it perfect for a winter window box like this one by @billywelcher.

The glossy, two-tone leaves create a soft bed of texture that contrasts nicely with the red berries and stems. To keep your magnolia trimmings fresh, cut the branches at a 45-degree angle so there is more surface to absorb water. Keep the trimmings in a bucket of water until you’re ready to assemble your boxes.

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Winter Window Boxcourtesy @rpmarzillilandscape/instagram

Winter Greens

This winter window box idea by @rpmarzillilandscape is monochromatic but still manages to be beautifully festive. Curling branches provide height while the two types of pine create volume inside the box and trailing over the side. Bunches of pine cones add a playful finish.

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Berry Merry Window Boxcourtesy @red_barn_florals/instagram

Berry Merry

Here’s another winter window box idea that combines all our favorite holiday greenery — pine branches, magnolia and red berries and stems. Keep your window boxes and planters watered, spraying the needles and leaves as well as the soil.

If you live in a cold climate like Ontario, Canada, where this window box by @red_barn_florals is located, you’re in luck. Greenery in colder climates that’s out of direct sunlight will last and look fresh longer.

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Autumn To Winter Transition Window Boxcourtesy @windowboxgardener/instagram

Autumn to Winter Transition

This winter window box from @windowboxgardener includes orange and brown for fall, as well as red berries and pine cones as a nod to winter. Something like this looks great for Thanksgiving decorations and festivities, and you can continue enjoying it all winter long. Remove the autumn greenery, then add more berries and pine cones as Christmas approaches.

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Faux Christmas Tree Window Boxcourtesy @redefinedky/instagram

Faux Christmas Tree

If you’re nervous about keeping live greenery fresh, there’s nothing wrong with using faux stems for your winter window box. This charming holiday window box by @redefinedky features a flocked faux mini Christmas tree and chic gold accents. It looks great and requires no watering!

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Winter Florals Window Boxcourtesy @claregillandesign/instagram

Winter Florals

If you live in a warmer climate that fosters winter flowers, there are endless possibilities for winter window boxes. This gorgeous window box by @claregillandesign features dark, leafy heuchera and cyclamen, which naturally bloom in the fall and winter. Hardy pansies add pops of color and texture.

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Branches And Baubles Window Boxcourtesy @windowboxgardener/instagram

Branches and Baubles

To add extra holiday cheer, nestle Christmas ornaments among the greenery, like in this display by @windowboxgardener. Opt for plastic ornaments rather than glass; they’ll hold up to the elements better. Vary the sizes for added interest, but make sure they’re all big enough to see from a distance.

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Chic Chartreuse Window Boxcourtesy westcoastgardens/instagram

Chic Chartreuse

There are no evergreens or berries in this winter box by @westcoastgardens! The white blossoms and bright chartreuse foliage offer non-traditional winter color, but still feel inspired by the cold season. The trailing vines are a great plant for window boxes because they add extra shape and volume.

Erica Young
Erica Young is a freelance writer and content creator, specializing in home and lifestyle pieces. She loves writing about home decor, organization, relationships, and pop culture. She holds a bachelor's degree in Journalism and Mass Communication from Arizona State University, the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.