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6 Best Storm Windows

You're ready to buy storm windows, but what kind? Interior or exterior? Budget or top-of-the-line? Read on for our picks for the best storm windows.

Every editorial product is independently selected, though we may be compensated or receive an affiliate commission if you buy something through our links.

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storm-windows_789831Svetlana Larina/Shutterstock

Buying Storm Windows

If your home has older windows, single-pane windows that are drafty in the winter, or windows with wooden frames, you may be thinking about buying storm windows. Storm windows fit into the interior or exterior frames of existing windows to provide an additional barrier against bad weather, wind and drafts. They can also increase the energy efficiency of your home while blocking out street noise and UV rays.

But not all storm windows are created equal. The type you buy may depend on your budget, the design of your house and aesthetics. Here, we’ve outlined our picks for the six best storm windows in various categories.

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storm windowvia Lowes.com

Best Energy-Efficient Storm Windows

For price and energy efficiency, this Larson aluminum storm window with low-E glass is the winner. The weatherstripping can reduce drafts by up to 40 percent, according to the manufacturer. Plus, we like that it has a half-screen, meaning you can fling open those windows when warm weather arrives.

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storm windowvia AlliedWindow.com

Best ‘Invisible’ Storm Windows

If you love the look of your existing window or you have an historic home, aesthetics matter. Allied Windows, Inc. creates custom-made storm windows known for their “invisible” quality. The storm window does its job without disrupting the historic character or charm of the existing windows.

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storm windowvia Homedepot.com

Best Value Storm Windows

These aluminum storm windows from Larson are our pick for an all-around upgrade to your existing windows at a reasonable price. All sizes are priced between $64 and $85. So even if your house has a dozen windows, you can purchase and mount these easy-to-install windows for $1,000 or less.

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storm window homevia Provia.com

Best Splurge Storm Windows

If you can afford a bigger investment in storm windows to be assured top quality, custom-made ProVia aluminum storm windows are our pick. Most come fitted with energy-efficient low-E glass and are designed with double or triple tracks and high-quality workmanship. ProVia claims they can reduce winter heating bills by more than 20 percent.

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storm windowvia Lowes.com

Best Interior Storm Windows

A lot of interior storm windows are removable panels. They do a good job at insulating, but they don’t allow you to open your windows on an unseasonably warm day. That’s one big reason we like Larson comfortSEAL interior storm windows. The windows are permanently installed and can be opened to allow air to circulate. They’re only available in white at Lowe’s, although they are made in other colors.

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storm windowVia indowwindows.com

Best Interior Storm Inserts

Distinct from an interior storm window, these insulating window inserts from Indow simply press into place and are removed at the end of cold weather season. Indow’s products come in various thicknesses and treatments. Entry-level inserts block drafts and reduce noise, while higher-grade inserts offer more complete soundproofing and UV protection.

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window insulator kitvia Amazon.com

Best Bargain Solution

If you really don’t want to spend much money but need to seal off those drafty windows, solutions don’t come much simpler — or cheaper — than this 3M Indoor Window Insulator Kit. Just cut the lightweight plastic film to fit the outer perimeter of your window interior, attach it with tape (included) and shrink it into place with a hairdryer. When springtime rolls around, dispose of the plastic film.

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Elizabeth Heath
Elizabeth Heath is a travel, culinary and lifestyle writer based in rural Umbria, Italy. Her work has appeared in The Washington Post, HuffPost, Frommers.com, TripSavvy and many other publications. Her guidebook, An Architecture Lover's Guide to Rome, was released in 2019. Liz's husband is a stonemason and together they are passionate about the great outdoors, endless home improvement projects, dogs, their unruly garden and their slightly less unruly eight-year-old.