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10 Smart and Practical Uses for Rubber Bands That Actually Work

You'll never look at a simple rubber band the same way again! Check out these ingenious hacks and practical uses for rubber bands that go far beyond their intended use. Rubber bands will soon become one of the most useful items in your toolbox.

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Rubber Band ClampsFamily Handyman

Rubber Band Clamps

You can buy special woodworking clamps to hold hardwood edging in place until the glue sets, but they're expensive and you won't use them often. Instead of buying specialty clamps, you can modify some of your spring clamps instead. Grab a few rubber bands and presto—instant edge clamps. These clever clamp storage tips help keep your workshop organized.
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Anti-Skid Level

Anti-Skid Level

Levels tend to slip when you're trying to mark a line on a wall. Make it an anti-skid level by sliding several rubber bands (or one fat one) over each end.
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No-Rattle Ceiling Fan

No-Rattle Ceiling Fan

If the screws that hold the light globe to your ceiling fan tend to work loose and then hum or rattle, slip a wide rubber band around the neck of the globe where the screws grip it. The rubber band prevents the screws from loosening, dampens any noise and protects the globe from overzealous screw tighteners.
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Paint Brush Drip StopperFamily Handyman

Paint Brush Drip Stopper

When you wipe your paint brush against the inside of the can, paint fills the rim and eventually runs down the side and onto the floor. Solve the problem by wiping the paint against a heavy rubber band wrapped around the center of the can. Excess paint will drip back into the can without making a mess or gumming up the lid. Check out this video for another paint-mess-control tip.
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Chain Saw Blade GuardFamily Handyman

Chain Saw Blade Guard

Protect a chain saw blade with 3/4-in. foam pipe insulation. Wrap the insulation around the blade and strap it tight with a couple of rubber bands. Chain saw need sharpening? Here's how.

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Small-Parts ClampFamily Handyman

Small-Parts Clamp

Make a small-parts clamp by wrapping a rubber band around the jaws of needle-nose pliers. The rubber band keeps the jaws of the pliers clamped together for holding small items. It works especially well for getting nuts into inaccessible spots or for starting small finish nails.
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Keep the Tape RollingFamily Handyman

Keep the Tape Rolling

Slip a rubber band over the 'ears' of your packing tape dispenser as shown to keep the end of the tape from falling through the slot and then back onto the roll. The tape won't stick to the rubber, so you'll always be ready to roll. Need some packing tape? Grab some now on Amazon.
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Nonslip ToolsFamily Handyman

Nonslip Tools

When you're working on the roof, wrap rubber bands around tools to help them stay put. The rubber will grip on roofs with up to a 6/12 slope. Keep yourself from slipping off the roof with these tips.
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No-Latch (or Hands-Free) Door TrickFamily Handyman

No-Latch (or Hands-Free) Door Trick

Need to go in and out of the same door a bunch of times while carrying stuff? Tough to do when the door keeps latching shut. To keep that from happening, take a rubber band and loop it around one doorknob or handle. Then, twist the rubber band once and then loop it around the other knob. The rubber band holds the latch down, preventing the door from latching shut. Now if the door closes, you can push it back open with your body even if your hands are full. If you have a door latch that's not working, here's an easy fix. Or find out how to fix a rattling door.
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Drill Bit GirdleFamily Handyman

Drill Bit Girdle

Save those wide rubber bands that are wrapped around broccoli and other veggies and stretch them over your electric or cordless drill. Use them for onboard storage of smaller drill and driver bits and screws. Wrangle the rest of your drill bits and other pointy tools with this wall-mounted 'pincushion.'