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8 Easiest Hosta Varieties to Grow

Although hostas aren't generally fickle to begin with, some are easier to grow than others. Here are eight low-care beauties to grow in your yard.

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Sum and Substance hostavia etsy.com

‘Sum and Substance’

This focal-point hosta can grow to 30 inches tall and a whopping five to six feet wide, although it will take several years of maturity to get to that size. ‘Sum and Substance‘ features large, slightly cupped leaves that tend toward chartreuse when given a few hours of sun, greener in full shade. Pale lavender blooms appear in mid to late summer. These grow best in USDA Hardiness Zones 3 to 8.

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Frances Williams Hostavia etsy.com

‘Frances Williams’

One of the best-known cultivars of hosta, ‘Frances Williams‘ features heart-shaped blue-green leaves with irregularly shaped gold borders. The variegated leaves really stand out in shade, especially when joined by white flowers in summer. ‘Frances Williams’ grows 18 to 24 inches tall and an impressive four to five feet wide. Its thick, puckered foliage is less prone to slug and wind damage than other hostas. Best in Zones 3 to 8.

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Patriot hostavia homedepot.com

‘Patriot’

It’s easy to see how this highly popular hosta earned its accolades, with a beautiful mounded shape and dark green lance-shaped leaves edged in glowing ivory. ‘Patriot‘ grows 12 to 18 inches tall and 24 to 30 inches wide, and is heat resistant if kept mulched and watered. It features lavender flowers in late summer. Zones 3 to 8. Avoid making these common hosta mistakes to keep your plant healthy.

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Elegans Hostavia homedepot.com

‘Elegans’

‘Elegans’ hosta is aptly named for its elegance in the shade garden with its regal, heart-shaped blue-green leaves. Along with their rich color which deepens to green as the summer wears on, the leaves feature interesting texture, with heavily corrugated ribbing that makes a nice backdrop for the white flowers tinged in lavender. ‘Elegans’ grows two to three feet tall and three to four feet wide. It’s is a good hosta for dry shade, and slug resistant. Zones 4 to 9.

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Halcyon Hostavia homedepot.com

‘Halcyon’

Like its name suggests, ‘Halcyon’ hosta is a fitting plant to add to the idyllic perennial garden of one’s dreams. Forming a perfect mound of beautiful blue foliage, it looks good all season if provided enough shade to keep its waxy blue hue intact. Then in mid-to-late summer, this slug-resistant hosta outdoes itself with pale lilac flowers. ‘Halcyon’ grows 18 to 24 inches. tall and 30 to 36 inches wide. Zones 3 to 8.

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Sun Power hostaundefined undefined/Getty Images

‘Sun Power’

No hosta likes full sun, but as the name suggests ‘Sun Power’ has more staying power against the rays, especially if it’s mulched and watered. ‘Sun Power’ features yellow-green leaves which look their brightest when given a few hours of sunlight, preferably in the morning when it’s less intense. It grows about two feet tall and three to four feet wide, boasting light lavender flowers. Zones 3 to 8. It’s one of the toughest landscaping plants.

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Blue Mouse Ears hostavia homedepot.com

‘Blue Mouse Ears’

This cute hosta takes a back seat to the giants as a focal point, but makes an outstanding edging or even container plant. Growing just six inches tall and one foot wide, this 2008 Hosta of the Year boasts a thick, symmetrical mound of soft gray-blue foliage. The slightly curled, heart-shaped leaves are topped by lavender flowers in summer. Zones 3 to 8.

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Coast to Coast hostavia homedepot.com

Shadowland ‘Coast to Coast’

The Hosta of the Year for 2020, Shadowland ‘Coast to Coast‘ is a giant clump-forming beauty with striking gold leaves and pale violet flowers. The thick, puckered leaves have unique wavy edges and hold up better to wind and slugs. The gold coloring is boldest when ‘Coast to Coast’ gets some morning sunlight. It grows about 30 inches tall and three feet wide. Zones 3 to 9.

 

Luke Miller
Luke Miller is an award-winning garden editor with 25 years' experience in horticultural communications, including editing a national magazine and creating print and online gardening content for a national retailer. He grew up across the street from a park arboretum and has a lifelong passion for gardening in general and trees in particular. In addition to his journalism degree, he has studied horticulture and is a Master Gardener.