Cook Safer and More Efficiently with the 5 Best Induction Stoves

From stylish to state-of-the-art, here are our picks for the best induction stoves for you and your kitchen.

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5 Best Induction Stoves For Safer, More Efficient CookingVIA MERCHANT

Induction stoves and cooktops are nothing new. The first model was introduced to the public by Westinghouse back in the 1970s. Over the last few decades, however, induction stoves have really gained popularity. Unlike most conventional gas or electric stovetops that use thermal conduction (transfer of heat from a flame or electric element to the cookware), the best induction stoves employ a magnetic induction current to provide a fast, safe and efficient appliance for preparing meals.

Andrew Forlines, a chef and kitchen appliance technology expert, says when you place a pot on the glass-ceramic induction burner surface, the cookware heats up but the burner will only be warm to the touch. That’s because the surface draws residual heat from the cookware. The burner never gets red-hot like an electric cooktop, so the food won’t burn. This makes induction stoves much easier to clean.

“One of the most common misconceptions about induction technology is that you must use ‘special’ or ‘induction-only’ pans on induction burners,” says Forlines. To work, the cookware must be magnetic. If a magnet sticks to the pot, then it will work. “Cast iron works very well on induction,” he says. Copper and aluminum do not.

Many people think gas burners are better than induction. Forlines disagrees. Induction, he says, converts 90% to 95% of usable heat into cooking. Gas is only 40% efficient. “Most of the gas you burn goes around the pan and into the air before the metal can absorb it,” he adds.

From eco-friendly to budget-conscious to splurge-worthy, our list of the best induction stoves will help guide you to the one that’s right for you. They’ve completely revolutionized the way we cook!

The Best Induction Stoves

1 / 5

Café Slide In Double Oven Induction Range
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Best Overall Induction Stove

Café Slide-In Double Oven Induction Range

Offering twice the meal-making capacity in a single range, the Café double oven induction range is an edge-to-edge cooktop with five burners for sautéing and simmering. It also features dual ovens for baking and broiling. With attractive stainless steel styling, this comes with Gourmet Guided Cooking technology that includes video-guided recipes by real, honest-to-goodness chefs. All in all, two ovens are better than one when it comes to the best induction stoves—especially in this 30-inch model.

“We had to remodel our kitchen due to a leak, so we took the opportunity to upgrade our oven/stove,” writes one five-star reviewer. “We have a fairly small kitchen, so loved the idea of this double-functioning unit in the same footprint of a standard range. Plus, with the air fry feature, it gave us the opportunity to eliminate our countertop air fryer.”

Pros

  • Cook, bake and boil several dishes at once
  • Both ovens are self-steam-cleaning
  • Built-in Wi-Fi to power controls by SmartHQ App
  • Has an air fryer feature
  • Cookware rebate available

Cons

  • On the pricier side

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2 / 5

Samsung Rapid Heat Smart Induction Range
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Best Value Induction Stove

Samsung Rapid Heat Smart Induction Range

The best induction stove for your household doesn’t have to cost an arm and a leg. Samsung’s induction range is affordably priced and includes a ton of extra features to boot. For instance, it connects via Wi-Fi using a smart app to preheat, monitor and adjust time and temperature. Plus, you can set your oven with your voice. This 30-inch model proves you can have it all without busting your budget.

“When building our new home, I knew we didn’t want a gas stove but weren’t sure what to expect from an electric stove. After a lot of research, we decide to do an induction oven and, boy, am I glad we did. I was able to preheat my oven from the second floor just by using voice assistant,” shares a five-star reviewer.

Pros

  • Affordably priced
  • Features self-cleaning and steam-cleaning function
  • App compatible with Amazon Alexa and Google Home assistants
  • Free six-piece cookware set with purchase

Cons

  • Samsung account required to connect to app

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3 / 5

Frigidaire 4 Elements Induction Cooktop
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Most Eco-Friendly Induction Stove

Frigidaire Four-Element Induction Cooktop

From a sustainability perspective, this Energy Star-rated Frigidaire 30-inch induction cooktop is an outstanding choice. With four large and powerful induction elements, the cooktop is a more energy-saving way to cook meals. It’s about 10% more efficient than conventional electric units and three times more efficient than gas. No need to stress over spills, either. The sleek and smooth black surface is easy as pie to wipe clean.

“We needed to switch everything from propane to electric, and this was one of the highest-rated induction cooktops available—plus it was on sale,” says a verified buyer. “It is very responsive and easy to operate, and we are pleased with the cooking results.”

Pros

  • Saves on home energy bills
  • Elements connect to create a larger cooking surface for oversized pans
  • Goes from simmer to boil in seconds
  • Auto-sizing pan detection

Cons

  • Only available in black
  • The touch slider won’t work with wet fingers

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4 / 5

Frigidaire Gallery Series Induction Range With Air Fry
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Best Induction Stove with Air Fryer

Frigidaire Gallery Series Induction Range with Air Fry

This fully electric and freestanding induction range from Frigidaire was the first of its kind to offer a built-in air fryer. With the air fry feature, you can make healthier meals without a separate appliance taking up space on your countertop. This 30-inch appliance features True Convection, which allows a more even baking result and a 50% faster and easier way to clean. Don’t have time to clean your stove as oven as you should? The fingerprint-resistant surface will come in handy.

“This Frigidaire induction range is exactly what I love about induction cooking. It is the most powerful induction range I have owned so far. It boils water in seconds for a small quantity to a few minutes for a large quantity. The range also can get my pans scorching hot,” writes five-star reviewer, Justin Gray.

Pros

  • Switches to air fry function with a touch of a button
  • Self-cleaning feature
  • Fingerprint-resistant surface
  • Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)-compliant

Cons

  • Front control panel is sensitive

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5 / 5

Duxtop Portable Induction Cooktop
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Best Portable Induction Stove

Duxtop Portable Induction Cooktop

Compact and portable enough to cook in small spaces or on the go, the Duxtop portable induction cooktop is a single-burner induction “hot plate” you can set up on the kitchen counter or RV—anywhere with access to a standard electrical outlet. Easy to operate, the Duxtop offers a lot of the functions you’d find in a full-size induction cooktop, like a digital LCD sensor-touch control panel, “fast boil” and “keep warm” buttons and a child safety lock. Not bad for a portable stove!

“I’m in the middle of a kitchen remodel, so I needed to set up a small kitchenette area so that I can not have to do takeout until the kitchen is ready (it’s going to be a few weeks),” shares Jeff Finkelstein, a verified purchaser. “This is my first foray into induction cooking. What I like about this is that it is stable, sturdy and heats up really well. My cast iron skillet is perfect—it has the iron content to work with the induction burner.”

Pros

  • Only weighs 6.2 pounds
  • Premium glass surface that’s easy to maintain
  • Digital countdown timer is programmable for up to 10 hours
  • Add-on cookware options available

Cons

  • Power cord is thick and tricky to tuck out of the way
  • The fan is noisy

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What to Consider When Buying an Induction Stove

Key factors to think about when comparing the best induction stoves are appliance size, type, cooking capacity (based on your household’s needs), budget and style. After deciding on the basics, ask yourself what other components and features matter to you. Do you want a booster for faster boiling? Preset menus? Extra-safety features, such as auto shutoffs and child locks? Smart connectivity?

“Across brands, there are a lot of performance similarities with induction since they source the electromagnetic generators from the same manufacturers,” Forlines says. “The big differences are in the interface (user input and interaction), aesthetics (design, knobs vs. touchscreen controls) and burner layout (designated or non-designated burners, number of cooking zones, etc.).”

Forlines says induction ranges and cooktops generally require 220 to 240 volts and 30 to 50 amps. However, plug-in countertop single burners are available in 110 volts.

Consider these factors:

  • Type: Your options are full-size ranges with ovens, cooktop-only and standalone portable models. The latter is an inexpensive way to try out induction cooking.
  • Price: This varies from around $100 for portables to $9,000 for “the works.” Because they’re operationally efficient, induction stoves can save money on utility costs over time.
  • Controls: Power, temperature and preset controls are generally available in rotating knobs, push buttons and touch sensors.
  • Interval temperature settings: The more temperature intervals available, the easier it is to adjust the heat.
  • Smart connectivity: “There are also some induction burners that can be set by temperature and/or have integrated app-driven, video-guided recipes for people to cook along with,” Forlines adds.
  • Extra features: A booster to boil water faster, preset cooking menus, automatic pan detection and safety sensors, like auto shutoffs and child locks, are available on some induction stoves.

Types of Induction Stoves

You can go with a full-size range with an oven, a freestanding or slide-in model or a cooktop-only (with four to five burners or “flex induction” that has cooking zones spread over the entire surface). For the most convenience, pick a space- and energy-saving portable model.

How We Found the Best Induction Stoves

As shopping experts, our only job is to help you find a winning product. We start with the research and reporting basics—what products are made of, what they look like and how much they cost—to ensure that we’re only recommending the buys that are worth your time and money. Then, we research the features that speak to the product’s quality, taking advice from industry insiders and subject matter experts on what makes a product a smart value (or worthy of a splurge). Finally, we do the work of combing through user reviews to see how real people interact with the product, and if it stands up to the test.

FAQ

How does an induction stove work?

Unlike electric and gas stoves, which work via thermal conduction, induction stoves use an electromagnetic field to generate the current through a copper coil wire placed inside burners. The result is pans and food get hot, but the burners remain cool to the touch. The only caveat is cookware must be magnetic (think cast iron). Note: Copper and aluminum pans won’t work on even the best induction stoves.

How do you clean an induction stove?

Since the surface of the cooktop never gets red-hot, spilled food won’t burn onto the ceramic/glass surface, making it easy to wipe it clean with a soft cloth. To prevent scratches on the ceramic-glass surface, be sure to avoid using steel wool, rough sponges and abrasive cleaners.

Source:

  • Andrew Forlines, chef and home kitchen appliance expert at ChefAF.com

Toni DeBella
Toni DeBella is a culture and lifestyle writer, reviews expert and DIYer covering everything from pests to pool cabanas to painting. For over a decade, Toni was the owner of a successful faux finishing, mural and children’s furniture business before moving to a career in writing. Her work has appeared in The Telegraph, Fodor’s, Italy Magazine, DK Eyewitness travel guides and others. She lives in a medieval hill town in Italy where her bicycle “Raoul” serves as her primary mode of transportation.