Sweet, Sweet Hardware Drawer

Keep your empty tins handy, and when you have a dozen or so, load them with hardware and place them in a custom-fit drawer.

The Family Handyman

Put your breath mint addiction to good use! Keep your empty tins handy, and when you have a dozen or so, load them with hardware and place them in a custom-fit drawer. The drawer slides inside a frame that’s enclosed on the sides and back. You can cut the wood with a jigsaw, but a table saw works best. Here’s how to make it.

From scrap 3/8-in. plywood, cut:

Two 1-1/2 in. x 8-3/4 in. front and back drawer pieces

Three 1-1/2 in. x 5-1/2 in. drawer sides and partition 

One 8-3/4 in. x 6-1/4 in. drawer bottom 

One 11-3/8 in. x 7-in. frame “ceiling” 

One 11-3/8 in. x 2-3/8 in. frame back

From a scrap 3/4-in. board, cut: 

Four 1/2-in. x 1/2-in. x 6-1/4 in. drawer glides 

Two 2-1/2 in. x 6-1/2 in. frame sides

Tack and glue the drawer together with 1-in. brads, locating the sides and partition inside the front and back ends. Tack glides on the drawer’s upper edges, and on the frame sides, then tack and glue the frame ceiling and back to the frame sides.

Install the frame for the drawer in a convenient spot, driving screws through the ceiling, then slide in the drawer. Then it’s time to take a breath (mint), and join us in saying thanks to Scott Arquette for this orderly tip.

Have a sticking wooden drawer? Here’s how to fix it.

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