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15 Home Trends Millennials are Loving Right Now

Millennials know what they want: peaceful, airy, minimalist spaces that incorporate elements of nature and their own personal aesthetic...in a nutshell. Here are 15 of home trends they're bringing to the forefront.

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SustainabilityDiyana Dimitrova/Shutterstock

Sustainability

Renewable resources, sustainable building, energy efficiency, and recycled materials — really, any kind of environmentally conscious design — is important to Millennials. More than half of those polled in a recent survey say they value that above all in a home, and more than half also say they’d love to have solar panels on their roofs.

Here are 10 inexpensive upgrades for a sustainable home.

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Smart Homes


In additional to being sustainability-minded, Millennials tend to value convenience. Homes that are designed with smart home technology that allows them to easily and even remotely control their lighting, appliances, entertainment, heating, cooling, security systems — the list goes on and on — are making this generation more apt to buy real estate, studies show.

These 10 cool smart gadgets are a great place to get started on making your home smart.

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Houseplants


Perhaps because they’re delaying home ownership — and even parenthood — Millennials are all about indoor gardens. By and large, houseplants abound in young people’s homes, and they tend to be treated like babies — this generation has even given rise to the term “plant moms.” Air plants, living walls, succulent gardens, and the trendy fiddle-leaf fig have come to represent America’s green-thumbed youth. All of these houseplants will purify your air.

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Built-In Storage


When you’re short on space, built-ins are a godsend. No one knows this better than an apartment-dwelling Millennial. If it’s a multi-functional piece of furniture with storage options, even better. In fact, according to real estate agents, a home with plenty of built-in closets, drawers and luxuries like wine coolers are more likely to be sold to buyers in this age group, who are less interested in square footage and more into smaller spaces used efficiently. These 15 home office storage ideas really work.

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singlehandlefaucet

Brushed and Matte Finishes


Shiny chrome will always have a place in our hearts, but matte black is coming out of the shadows as the new finish of choice for a new generation. Matte bronze and brushed nickel are making their own statements, too. They’re not showy, but they’re big on sophistication. Even tubs are losing their luster — in a good way — as satin finishes that give a matte appearance are popping up on porcelain.

The best bathroom and kitchen sink faucets, according to our experts.

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Specialty Rooms


Millennials just wanna have fun—and work out. In-home media rooms, play rooms, game rooms, and gyms are high on the wish lists of this anything-is-possible generation. Another option, if space allows? Wine cellars—after all, Millennials drink so much wine they’re changing the way it’s sold. If a wine cellar is not an option, a wine refrigerator will do, thank you very much. Check out these 25 cool game room ideas.

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Mid-Century Modern Design


After a few quiet decades, mid-century modern design — that is, decor and architecture from the 1950s and ’60s, primarily — came back with a bang in the 21st century, and it looks like it’s sticking around. Millennials are expressing interest in homes made around this time period, and according to a recent quiz by design brand Modsy, they’re also still digging the decor their grandparents made famous. It appeals to their minimalist, small-space aesthetic.

Check out these 14 iconic mid-century modern design elements.

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Minimalism


Very conscious of their carbon footprint, Millennials embrace the ethos that less is more. Modern living philosophies like KonMari, which urges you to identify what brings you joy and get rid of anything that does not, and Swedish death cleaning, which involves cutting the clutter in your environment to make sorting easier for the loved ones you leave behind (morbid we know), have helped nurture a culture of minimalism. In many ways, a mess is very last-generation. Here are 12 smart ways to downsize your home.

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Farmhouse Sinks


Deep, apron-front farmhouse sinks are having a moment thanks to Millennial homeowners. Home heroes Chip and Joanna Gaines have made these modern vessels cool again, and a new generation is here for it. Not only do farmhouse sinks have the capacity to hold more, they’re also easier to clean and lend a relaxed, rustic feel to the kitchen. Practical, low-maintenance, and laid-back are the orders of the day. Never do these 10 things during a kitchen renovation.

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Personalization


This generation demands to be seen and heard — Millennials want to be recognized as individuals. Rather than staging their homes to look like showrooms or catalogs, they want their interiors to reflect their personal styles and preferences. Customized furniture, handmade accessories, one-of-a-kind vintage scores and art that reflects their interests reign supreme in their domains. Live in an apartment? Here are 12 easy ways to personalize it.

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Statement Rugs


Searches for statement rugs have been on the rise on Pinterest this year, as Millennials are snapping up these textiles that make it easy to punch up a room with color and pattern in one fell swoop. Among the most popular designs are geometrics, Moroccan, large-scale prints and tribal patterns.

Here are those carpet-cleaning tips you’ve been looking for.

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Open Floor Plans


The walls are coming down for Millennials. For this generation, it’s all about the airy appeal of open floor plans and loft-style interiors. As it turns out, these cavernous kinds of layouts are not only good for letting energy flow — appealing to the peace-loving dweller — but they also help open up the smaller, generally urban homes this generation tends to prefer. Check out the 6 most popular house styles in the U.S.

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Quiet Exhaust Fans


Millennials aren’t investing so much into peaceful, clutter-free, nature-inspired interiors only to let noise ruin their vibe. Among the most coveted features for new homes, as this generation dips its toes into the real estate market, is whisper-quiet exhaust fans and vent hoods. Manufacturers are meeting the demand by making low-sone fans that are actually powerful enough to get the job done.

Here are some creative ways to disguise a vent hood.

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Subway Tiles


Classic white subway tiles are dominating the market when it comes to bathrooms and backsplashes. The 3-inch-by-6-inch ceramic tiles were literally popularized in New York City subways in the early 20th century. Perhaps it’s that vintage flair that appeals to Millennials, or maybe it’s the simplicity or affordability, but these tiles are everywhere. What’s next? Subway tiles in Millennial pink? Well, yes.

Master the art of the subway tile.

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Natural Stone and Wood


The ornate, Mediterranean-inspired interiors of the Baby Boomer generation have been all but phased out by Millennials, who prefer a simpler environment furnished with naturally occurring elements like wood and stone — think butcher block countertops and limestone fireplaces. Bringing the outdoors in is a prominent principle that carries over into many areas of the home. Now, marvel at these amazing stone patios.