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Vintage Family Handyman Feature from 1970: How to Repair Your Power Tools

Family Handyman has always taken great pride in teaching readers to DIY through step-by-step projects. To celebrate our 70th anniversary, here's a look back at this vintage tool repair project.

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70s tool repair projectFamily Handyman

How to Repair Your Power Tools Project

Family Handyman launched in 1951, so 2021 marks our 70th anniversary. We’re celebrating with some of our favorite content from over the years. This vintage repairing your power tools project ran in our April 1970 issue. “A tool expert tells you how to save time and money by making these simple repairs on your electric tools.”

Do you love the ’70s? Check out these Family Handyman vintage covers from the ‘70s.

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70s tool repair projectFamily Handyman

Repairing Disconnected Wires

Wires disconnected at the plug — usually caused by yanking the plug out of the socket by its cord. If it is a replaceable plug, you can see if the wires are under the screws and if the screws are tight.”

Plus, check out these Family Handyman vintage Walmart ads from the ’70s.

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70s tool repair projectFamily Handyman

Repairing Bad Brushes

“Loosening of a screw that holds brush holder prevents brush from coming through brass liner in brush holder.”

Plus, check then and now: Vintage home trends that will take you way back.

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70s tool repair projectFamily Handyman

Types of Terminal Binders

Shown above are two types of terminal binders. “At left the soldered ends of wires are simply inserted into the two holes in the switch. In switch at right wires are attached to screws.”

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70s tool repair projectFamily Handyman

Checking for an Internal Break

“To check for an internal break, you need an ohm meter or a simple continuity tester that you can make yourself for the cost of one flashlight battery, a few pieces of any kind of wire and a flashlight bulb.”

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70s tool repair projectFamily Handyman

Tool Repair Diagram

Shown above is an exploded diagram of a Porter Cable Model 350M router motor, which shows typical electrical tool parts with emphasis on those that DIYers can most easily learn to adjust or repair.

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70s tool repair projectFamily Handyman

Incorrectly Wired Plugs

The plug shown above is incorrectly wired. “The ground wire has been cut off. The loose strands should be under the screws of the terminal.” Be sure to watch out for these common wiring mistakes that trip up DIYers working on electrical projects.

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70s tool repair projectFamily Handyman

Troubleshooters Chart for Repairs on a Dead tool

Check out the chart above to learn various ways to troubleshoot repairs on dead tools.

For more amazing vintage Family Handyman content, visit our 70th Anniversary Page.