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Things You Shouldn’t Own If You Have a Dog

You might not know these things are dangerous to dogs.

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holey trash canFamily Handyman

An Open Trash Can

Since dogs are known to get into trash cans, it’s best to have a lid on a trash can so they can’t start eating things they aren’t supposed to. Plus, some items in your trash could be indigestible for your dog and created a choking scenario.  Check out this solution to get rid of a nasty trash can smell in less than 10 seconds.

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Lucas Tscherteu/Shutterstock

Potpourri

Potpourri can make your dog sick if they ingest it and cause vomiting or diarrhea. Since potpourri comes in several varieties, those with tiny pine cones or bark chips can create a choking hazard.

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woman sleeps on top of an electric blanketAgenturfotografin/Shutterstock

Electric Blankets

Using your electric blanket on your dog isn’t a good idea because humans and dogs have different body temperatures. There are electric blankets available just for dogs that work on low voltage so they’re safe for dogs, according to the American Kennel Club. But be careful with older electric blankets because some may not have a chew-resistant cord. Check out our 17 best tips for pet care and pet safety, including a way to make electrical cords chew-proof.

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mousetrapFamily Handyman

Classic Mousetraps

Classic, spring-loaded mice traps are not considered safe to use if you have a dog at home because they can get into them accidentally. Instead try a mousetrap that lures the mouse into a self-contained trap, like this one from Amazon. Try these tips to keep mice away from your house for good.

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MothballsJaiz Anuar/Shutterstock

Mothballs

Illegal naphthalene moth repellent products are hazardous to pets and young children and should not be used outside of what the product’s label allows. Most modern mothballs are not as toxic but they contain insect repellent, which can cause illness in dogs if ingested. Keep your home clean with these tips every dog or cat owner should know.

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HH Handy hint swiffer floor sweeper dryer sheetsFamily Handyman

Fabric Softener Sheets

Fabric softener sheets and dryer sheets can cause problems for your dog because they contain cationic detergent and fragrances that can cause skin and respiratory irritation, according to Pet MDs.

Are you aware of these 11 household items that are seriously hazardous for your pets?

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Rawhide-Chew-Toys-for-Dogsamstockphoto/Shutterstock

Rawhide Chew Toys

Some people like to have rawhide chew toys around for their dog because it helps with their chewing needs but there are some risks involved with them. Rawhide chew toys can get contaminated and can contain trace amounts of toxic chemicals, according to WebMD. There is also Salmonella or E. coli contamination possibilities, too. Plus, the chew toys can be difficult for your dog to digest or it can get struck in their esophagus or digestive tract. Take a look at one of these 10 high-tech gadgets you and your pet will love.

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air freshener sprayANTON TEPLYAKOV/Shutterstock

Liquid Air Fresheners

Liquid air fresheners, like with fabric softeners and dryer sheets, contain cationic detergent. If your dog shows difficulty walking, vomits or paws at their face, they might have been poisoned from an air freshener, according to Cheat Sheet.

Check out 15 pet products with nearly perfect reviews on Amazon.

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glue bottle lidFamily Handyman

Adhesives

Adhesives that are diisocyanate glues are dangerous for dogs because the glue will expand in their digestive system. According to Pet Poison Control, the glue can cause an obstruction that often requires surgery to remove. Just 1 to 2 teaspoons can cause obstruction. Try one of these 53 brilliant gluing tricks with your next project.

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Bowl of Xylitolmorisfoto/Shutterstock

Xylitol

Xylitol is used as an artificial sweetener that’s found in gum, candy and toothpaste. While it’s safe for humans, it can cause low blood sugar in dogs and possible liver failure, according to NomNomNow.

This is the real cost of owning a dog.