What You Need to Know About Window Bird Feeders

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Even if you don't have a big backyard, you can still enjoy attracting and feeding the birds. We found the best window bird feeders.

If you live in an apartment building or your yard lacks trees, you can still enjoy the birds. There are window bird feeders you can attach right to the glass with suction cups.

“A window bird feeder can keep mealtimes interesting,” says wildlife artist Heather Bartmann of Fort Collins, Colorado. Her main visitors are house sparrows, but even the most common birds are fun to watch if you can observe their behavior up close.

Serve birds their favorite seeds in an acrylic window bird feeder if you are tight on space. Make sure it has tiny perches for songbirds. The small perches prevent nuisance birds, like grackles and pigeons, from gaining access to the seeds. You can also find window hummingbird feeders and suet feeders.

After all, one important consideration when setting up feeders is yourself! The better your view of the birds, the more you’ll enjoy them. Ultimately, the best seat in the house is wherever you can easily see the birds.

And don’t worry, window bird feeders are not dangerous to the birds. To prevent bird strikes on windows, feeders should be within three feet or outside of 10 feet of all windows.

The Best Window Bird Feeders

window bird feeder

Window Bird House Feeder

This plastic feeder attaches to the glass to give you a clear view of the birds. It includes a small perch and two removable seed trays (for easy cleaning!), so you can offer more than one type of food. A sloped roof offers protection from the rain.

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large platform window feeder

Large Platform Window Feeder

This heavy-duty open platform feeder will accommodate larger birds like mourning doves and even squirrels without falling down. It is handmade of durable red cedar wood with a mesh aluminum bottom for drainage.

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window suet feeder

Kettle Moraine Window-Mount Suet Feeder

Try a window-mount suet feeder to get close-up looks at chickadees, nuthatches and woodpeckers. Two strong suction cups hold it firmly in place.

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window suet feeder

Window Suet Feeder

This window suet feeder is handmade with a cypress wood base. Suet gives birds extra nutrition and energy on cold winter days.

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window hummingbird feeder

Nature Anywhere Window Hummingbird Feeder

This is a traditional bottle hummingbird feeder with a twist — it attaches directly to the window with three industrial strength suction cups. The bottle is easy to remove from the metal bracket base for filling and cleaning. And it is guaranteed to never fall down.

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window hummingbird feeder

Aspects Jewel Box Window Hummingbird Feeder

If you prefer a saucer style hummingbird feeder, try this version that attaches to the window with a suction cup bracket. It includes a built-in ant moat tray that wraps around the feeder and a perch for the birds to rest. The feeder portion lifts out of the base for cleaning, and the lid is hinged for easy sugar water refills.

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window hummingbird feeder

Copper Window Mount Hummingbird Feeder

These test tubes are just the right size for tiny hummingbirds. Keep in mind that they will need to be filled much more often than a larger nectar feeder. We love the pretty copper perch that looks like a tree branch.

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How to Make a DIY Window Bird Feeder

Create a window shelf, a simple board nailed to the sill, “to enjoy the birds at very close quarters,” ornithologist Roger Tory Peterson urged 85 years ago in Bird-Lore magazine. After all, the benefits of bird feeding are for you just as much as for the birds.

“I attach a board to the window ledge and sprinkle sunflower seeds across it,” says Grace Huffman of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. “The birds come to the makeshift feeder even with me watching. The key is nearby shrubs that offer the birds protection.”

acorn woodpecker
Acorn woodpeckers enjoying oranges

If you have a deck railing or a patio, here’s a simple trick to see orioles and other fruit-eating birds up close — just spear an orange half on a nail!