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How to Glue Biscuit Joints

The Family Handyman editor, Ken Collier, shows you how to glue and clamp biscuit joints for a strong and nearly invisible joint.

Source: TheFamilyHandyman

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  1. How to Make a Biscuit Joint

    Source:TheFamilyHandyman

    The Family Handyman editor, Ken Collier, shows you how to make biscuit joints and shares tips on how to get a better and stronger joint. This technique is great for building cabinets, bookshelves and other woodworking projects.

  2. How to Create Rustic Furniture Mortise and Tenon

    Source:WoodWorkersGuild

    Rustic furniture can be a great addition to any room in your house. If you struggle with the joinery or would like to discover the best way to “connect the parts,” let George Vondriska show you a foolproof method to perfect mortise and tenon joinery.

  3. How to Use a Frame Mortise and Tenon Jig

    Source:WoodWorkersGuild

    George Vondriska provides step-by-step instruction on how to use an FMT (Frame Mortise and Tenon) jig to cut a tenon and mortise.

  4. How to Use a One Piece Tongue and Groove Bit

    Source:WoodWorkersGuild

    George Vondriska provides instruction on how to setup a router table to use a one piece tongue and groove bit.

  1. Make a Perfect Miter Joint

    In pursuit of the perfect miter joint? These tips for tighter miters cover common situations you’ll undoubtedly encounter in your workshop.

  2. How to Make a Biscuit Joint

    Take your woodworking skills up a notch. Learn how to make the four basic biscuit joints with these close-up, step-by-step photos and videos.

  3. How to Use Pocket Screws

    Even a novice can build nice cabinets. Make tight, strong wood joints quickly and easily with pockets screws. No clamps, no dowels. We show you how to do it in two steps.

  4. Patch a Hardwood Floor

    We'll show you how to replace a damaged hardwood floorboard in just a couple hours using basic carpentry tools. This article covers removing a hole-filled or otherwise damaged tongue-and-groove board, then installing a new one.

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