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  1. DIY Bathroom Storage

    Who doesn't need more storage space in their bathroom? These clever tips will help you take advantage of every square inch so you can keep all of your bathroom supplies tidy, well organized, and close at hand.

Other Projects for DIYers from The Family Handyman:

  1. Garage Storage : Space -Saving Sliding Shelves

    Project

    There never seems to be enough storage space in garages, but rollout shelves and sliding bypass units can make more efficient use of the sidewalls of your garage.

  2. Small Workshop Storage Solutions

    Project

    You don’t need a gigantic workshop to produce beautiful woodworking projects. You just need to use your existing space wisely. In this article, we’ll show how to squeeze the most space from a tiny shop. We’ll give you tips for storing tools and materials so they’re out of your way, organizing your shop so there’s more room to work, and building storage units that keep items off the floor so you’re not tripping over them. We’ll also show you how to build a dedicated shelf for your air compressor, fold-up worktables, ceiling drawers, pegboard shelving, overhead storage , a small fold-away table for a grinder and stackable stools that make great work surfaces.

  3. Garage Storage Ideas: Find Unused Space

    Project

    Create a huge, accessible storage platform on the upper walls of your garage without taking up any floor space. With these 2-ft. wide shelves you can make 150 square feet of storage space in a weekend.

  4. Storage : How to Triple Your Closet Storage Space

    Project

    Build your own birch plywood closet organizer for half the cost of buying one. Using this simple design you can build an organizer to fit any size closet in a weekend.

  5. Garage Storage Tower

    Project

    Here's an easy-to-build tower for storing stuff in your garage, basement or mudroom—it's perfect for organizing those big, plastic storage bins you keep throwing everything into. And you can build two or three towers in a weekend without breaking the bank.

  6. 12 Simple Storage Solutions

    Project

    Need more room for your stuff? Learn 12 new solutions for storage space problems—everything from hidden shelves to shoe racks to recycling towers and more.

  7. Storage Tips for Cutting Clutter

    Project

    Are your closets and garage overflowing with stuff? Are your kitchen cabinets stuffed to capacity? You don't need to spend a lot of money to find new storage space in your home. You just need these clutter-busting strategies from our organizational gurus to organize every room of your house.

  8. Kitchen Storage Projects That Create More Space

    Project

    These 5 projects will create more space in your cabinets. You can unlock hidden storage space in your kitchen by opening up the hard-to-get-at corners, nooks and crannies of your cabinets. Squeeze more space from deep base cabinets and corner cabinets and add versatile new features to old cabinets.

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Other Articles for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. Rafter Storage - Bob Vila Radio - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    If you’re just moving into a tiny starter home, making room for growing children, or downsizing into smaller quarters after the kids have moved out, chances are you’re in search of extra storage space .

  2. Logs as Storage - Storing Firewood - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    Logs as Storage - Don't settle for an ordinary pile of logs. Showing off your wood in a creative space will help add another dimension of warmth to your home.

  3. Storing Sandpaper - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    The more you take on DIY projects the more important storing sandpaper becomes to your productivity and peace of mind.

  4. Storing Sandpaper - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    The more you take on DIY projects the more important storing sandpaper becomes to your productivity and peace of mind.

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Other Videos for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. How to Re-Organize Your Storage Space

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Before you start re-organizing your storage space , you should understand the benefits of being organized.

  2. Choosing a Design for Organizing a Storage Space

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Learn how to choose a design for organizing a storage space .

  3. Measuring and Planning for Organizing a Storage Space

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    In this video you will learn how to measure and plan a storage space before you start organizing it.

  4. How to Upcycle Bathroom Storage Space

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Join Re-habitat host Rachael Ranney as she upcycles an old interior door to create space-saving bathroom storage .

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Blog Posts

  1. Storing Pipe Clamps With A Racor 450 Wall Storage Rack

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

    Racor 450 Pound Heavy Duty Wall Storage Rack PLM-1R If your a woodworker or a finish carpenter you most likely have an assortment of clamps.  I use pipe clamps all the time and hate seeing them... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

  2. Bathroom Storage Idea: Add Recessed Shelves!

    Blog

    FromPosts tagged: bathroom

    When you find yourself with a too-small bathroom with not enough storage space , here's an idea that might solve at least one of those problems.   This storage idea requires some power tool action, which was no problem for Christen, whose blog Pregnant with Power Tools is self-descriptive of her ...

  3. Tall Workbench with Wood Storage

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    DIY tall workbench with wood storage plans Create the overall frame of the project by adding the longer 2x4s cross wise.  Use your pocket hole jig to attach with 1-1/2" setting, 2-1/2" pocket hole screws. If your shelves will need additional support, add it now.  If you will be storing long pieces of lumber, they won't need additional support underneath. Project Type:  Storage Cabinets Home DIY Other Projects Skill Level:  Intermediate Room:  Craftroom Style:  Industrial Dimensions:  This is a tall workbench (bar height) when caster wheels are added. Eight foot long lumber will fit inside, but will extend outward 12" on each end. Cut List:  2 - 2x4 @ 51" 2 - 2x4 @ 30" 2 - 2x4 @ 32" 2 - 2x4 @ 34" 4 - 2x4 @ 28" 6 - 2x4 @ 64" 3 - 1/2" plywood or OSB @ 72" x 28" (shelving, could be 24" wide to conserve plywood or you could also slat shelves with 1x3 or similar boards cut 72" long) 1 - 1/4" plywood @ 72"x38" (front - optional, shelving can be exposed as well) 1 - 3/4" plywood @ 72" x 31" (tabletop) 1 - pegboard or plywood scrap 72" x 14-1/2" (back splash)         Cutting Instructions:  Author Notes:  Hi everyone!  I'm so delighted to share today with you both a new project and a new building blogger!!!   Meet Jenn from Rock.Paper.Scissors, Shoot! ! - Hi everyone, my name is Jenn, from Rock, Paper, Scissors, Shoot! ( jennblogshere.com I love taking on new projects (Sewing? Wood Burning? Beekeeping?! Yes, all of it!) and traveling (just got back from Thailand!). One of my recent projects began when I purchased a home this past January. It’s straight out of the 60’s and I am over-confidently DIYing as much as I can to fix this place up! Here's a few projects Jenn has taken on - DIY Rock Siding DIY Concrete Countertop update DIY Bathroom wall storage with jars and hooks DIY American Girl Sized Doll Bed And today's project - new workbench with lumber storage ! There is an awesome workroom in the basement of my house, which unfortunately had some water damage. After fixing that up, I needed to organize the room a bit more – there’s nothing more frustrating than fixing up a house and constantly loosing tools! I needed a good place to store wood scraps, and house my miter saw – which I use SO often. This solution solved both problems while allowing me to store commonly-used items to be readily available! Jenn has lots more photos - including juicy before and afters and those so useful construction photos - in her blog post as well, so go check that out right now. Jenn's been awesome enough to let us share plans for her workbench below - check them out!  And if you want to keep up with Jenn and her DIY blog, make sure you follow her on Instagram and add her blog to your must read list! Have an awesome day! XO Ana + Family Start by building two of the side pieces.  I recommend using your Kreg Jig here to attach these boards together with 1-1/2" pocket holes and 2-1/2" pocket hole screws.   Lay shelving pieces on top and nail down with glue.  Use 1-1/4" brad nails. Attach pegboard to back of project with either 1-1/4" nails or screws and glue. If you are adding 1/4" plywood to front, screw or nail down with glue.  If you omit this piece, you may need to add some cross bracing to prevent racking to the front. Attach countertop with glue and screws (2").   Attach caster wheels to base of cabinet with screws. Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed. Finish Used:  Please read through the entire plan and all comments before beginning this project. It is also advisable to review the Getting Started Section. Take all necessary precautions to build safely and smartly. Work on a clean level surface, free of imperfections or debris. Always use straight boards. Check for square after each step. Always predrill holes before attaching with screws. Use glue with finish nails for a stronger hold. Wipe excess glue off bare wood for stained projects, as dried glue will not take stain. Be safe, have fun, and ask for help if you need it. Good luck! Photo Credits:  Shopping List:  8 - 2x4 @ 8 feet long 2 - sheets of 1/2" plywood (can also use 1x3 boards for shelving) 1 - sheet of 1/4" plywood (optional front, can be omitted for open front shelving) 1 - 3/4" plywood for tabletop 4 caster wheels 2 inch screws 1 1/4 inch finish nails 2-1/2" Pocket Hole Screws Elmer's Wood Glue Elmer's Wood Filler Tools:  measuring tape square pencil safety glasses hearing protection Kreg Jig Drill Circular Saw brad nailer Step 21:  Step 22:  Step 23:  Step 24:  Step 25:  Step 26:  Step27: 

  4. 15 LEGO Storage Solutions - Built by Kids

    Blog

    FromBuilt by Kids

    LEGO storage comes in all shapes and sizes - here are some of our favorites

  5. 6" Filler Tray Base Cabinet - Momplex Vanilla Kitchen

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    How to build a 6" filler base cabinet for tray storage - step by step plans from Ana-White.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  Well, this is it!  The final base cabinet we built for the Momplex Vanilla kitchen. And if our plan works, most people (unless you are a DIY dork like us or just as cabinetry obsessed) may never even know it's a cabinet! After building the blind corner cabinet and the sink base cabinet , and positioning all the cabinets in place, we ended up with a 6-3/4" gap between the sink base and the corner. What to do?  Filler strip? I can promise you this.  If we had put a filler strip in, it would have bugged me for The. Rest. Of. My. Life.   I would have lost endless nights of sleep over the wasted space that could have been .... There would have been terrible regrets, nightmares .... Oh, the things that could have been stored in there! So to prevent such hardships, the Ram and I build a little cabinet, exactly 6-3/4" wide,  Designed for tray son the bottom, lids or cutting boards on top, But being that it's cornered literally in the corner, we couldn't put a normal door with knob on it. The knob would hit the blind corner cabinet.  And because it's so narrow, a standard door with raised panel is impossible to build.  (Or do what I really wanted, which was a pull out filler cabinet .... ) So we ordered with our doors a flat drawer face and hinged it on, crossed our fingers it would work ... And what do you know? I'll definitely be sleeping at night. Well, at least until our new baby decides to arrive. Read on below, I'm sharing the plans for a 6" filler tray storage base cabinet - just add to it to get the exact size you need for your kitchen! Happy Building!  XO Ana PS - just have to share a sunset picture from the Momplex with you! Taken at 3:30 in the afternoon of course!  Gotta love Decembers in Alaska. Materials and Tools Shopping List:  3/4" plywood ripped into strips 22 1/4" long (for sides and shelves) 3/4" plywood scrap from ripping sides and shelves (for top supports) 3/4" plywood ripped into strips 5" long (for base supports - use cheaper plywood here) 1x2s for face frames (only need about 1 foot) 6 feet of 1x1 hardwood in matching species (we ripped ours on the table saw) 1/4" plywood (for backs) 1-1/4" pocket hole screws 2" wood screws for attaching shelves 3/4" finish nails edge banding for shelves 2 - 1/2" Overlay Frameless Concealed Hinges NOTE: We used PureBond Formaldehyde Free Plywood in Prefinished Maple for the interiors of these cabinets and built face frames out of poplar. Then all we had to do was paint the face frame and attach and the enitre cabinet was finished. Tools:  measuring tape square pencil safety glasses hearing protection Kreg Jig™ drill jigsaw compound miter saw table saw nailer sander countersink drill bit Cut List Cut List:  CARCASS 2 - 3/4" plywood @ 22 1/4" x 34 1/2" (side panels) 2 - 3/4" plywood @ 22 1/4" x 4-1/2" (bottom shelf and optional center shelf) 2 - 3/4" plywood @ 5" x 4-1/2" (bottom supports) 2 - 3/4" plywood @ 3 1/2" (can vary) x 4-1/2" (top supports) 1 - 1/4" plywood @ 32" x 6" (back) FACE FRAME 2 - 1x1 @ 27" 2 - 1x2 @ 6" 1 - 1x1 @ 4-1/2" DOOR/DRAWER FACE for 1/2" but appears as FULL OVERLAY (1/2" for this cabinet because the stiles are only 3/4" wide) 5 1/2" x 28 1/2" (drawer face) NOTE: When ordering doors/drawers, make sure the overall height matches the rest of your cabinets. The goal is 1/2" reveal between all doors/drawer faces with full overlay doors/drawers. On the sides, 1/4" is revealed per cabinet, adding to the total 1/2" reveal. Step 1 IMPORTANT: There are lots of different cabinet plans on this site - if you are building a full kitchen, make sure you use the same collection of plans throughout - where the sides of each base match exactly. This plan belongs with the Momplex Vanilla Kitchen collection of plans. Start with the sides - they must be indential to all the sides in your base cabinets for the cabinets to line up. However, this cabinet is designed without adjustable shelves, so no need for shelf pins. Remember that the two sides are made in mirror, with the pocket holes on the outsides of the sides for attaching the face frame in later steps. Make sure your toekicks are all cut consistently. Step 2 We used cheaper plywood for the bottom bases just because it all gets covered up. We ripped strips 5" wide, and then cut those down to the needed lengths per cabinet. Place 3/4" pocket holes on the outsides so it's easy to get your drill in there. Also, drill 3/4" pocket holes facing upward for attaching bottom shelf. Attach through 3/4" pocket holes with 1-1/4" pocket hole screws. Step 3 Because you may be able to see the top support boards, we used the excess strip of 3/4" finished plywodo for the top supports. It ended up being about 3-1/2" wide. You could also use 1x boards - the width can really vary here. Step 4 The shelves have to be attached from the outside - we countersunk 2" wood trim screws. Step 5 We cut the backs on all of our cabinets at 32" (instead of the full 34-1/2") to conserve plywood. We nailed our backs on with 3/4" plywood and glue. Step 6 Because this cabinet is so narrow, we did not want to loose valueable storage space with a face frame that overextends the sides (as the other bases do) and inside of cabinet. Instead, we ripped poplar down to 1x1 sizes (3/4" x 3/4") and used the 1x1s as stiles and trim for the shelf. The top and bottom are consistently 1x2s to match the rest of the cabinets. We built the face frame first using 3/4" pocket holes (just one per end of each 1x1) and 1-1/4" pocket hole screws and glue. The face frame then gets attached through the pocket holes drilled in step 1 in the sides and step 3 in the top support. Step 7 Because the face frame changed on this cabinet, we then had to use a 1/2" overlay on the door (as opposed to standard 1-1/4" overlay for face frame cabinets). The hinge also should be for frameless cabinets as the cabinet mounting bracket will differ - specifically a 1/2" Overlay Frameless Concealed Hinge. Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed. May I Suggest a Finish? Weathered Pine Stain Walnut Minwax Express Color on Cedar Authentic Vintage Distressed Finish with Minwax...   1 of 9 ››

  6. 42" Base Blind Corner Cabinet - Momplex Vanilla Kitchen

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    How to build a blind corner base kitchen cabinet - step by step plans from Ana-White.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  Moving down the line of cabinets today! You got a little sneak peek of how we built a base cabinet for the other corner of the Momplex Vanilla kitchen in our drawer installation post  -  Unlike the other side where we had lots of room for a big 36" pie cut lazy susan base cabinet , on the right side of the range, there really wasn't room for much of anything in that corner.   But we didn't want to waste any precious storage space either ... But at the same time, we wanted the two cabinets flanking the range to be symmetrical in appearance. What to do??? We built a blind corner kitchen cabinet, of course!  That has the same drawers/doors as the 21" base cabinet to the left of the range for symmetry, But is NOT the same on the inside - It's actually double the size inside! SIDE NOTE: Don't you love that prefinished PureBond plywood inside?  Yep, no reaching inside to paint!   It is in fact so big, you will need a pint sized helper to adjust the shelves.  That is, if you are looking "ready to pop" (yes, that's a direct quote) preggers.   Otherwise, I'm sure you'd fit just fine. We could have actually went even bigger inside, but I started stressing that too deep of a blind corner would become a black hole for all the appliances and gadgets that looked so life changing on tv ... and then really only got used once.   You know what I'm talking about.   The blind corner cabinet is really just a base cabinet with a funny face frame.  But there are a few things to consider when building: - Depending on the way your doors will swing or if you have any drawers, you will need filler strips (recommended at least 3" on either side of the corner).  For the blind corner itself, we built the filler strip in by using a 1x6 in the center of the face frame.  This also gives us quite a bit of wiggle room for adjusting the overall run of the cabinets. - Shelves start sagging (depending on the material it could be more or less) at about 36" in span.  So if you are building a 48" blind corner, you'll need to reinforce that shelf somewhere in the center. - If you are using a blind corner hardware shelving kit, order it first and build your cabinet to suit the kit. - If your blind corner doesn't extend all the way to the wall, make sure you add a cleat to support the countertop on the wall itself. - Because walls in kitchens aren't always perfectly square and because walls aren't normally a factor of 3" exactly, use the blind corner as an adjustment cabinet so you don't have to throw filler strips in later.  When we installed the cabinets, we started at the other corner, worked our way down, and whatever was leftover was left blank in the corner.  A word of caution though - make sure your cabinets on the other side cover the blind corner opening. So let's dive in and get building on that blind corner cabinet!!! RECOMMENDED: Please read this post on building base cabinets before tackling this plan. Materials and Tools Shopping List:  3/4" plywood ripped into strips 22 1/4" long (for sides and shelves) 3/4" plywood scrap from ripping sides and shelves (for top supports) 3/4" plywood ripped into strips 5" long (for base supports - use cheaper plywood here) 1x2s for face frames 1x6 (or other wide width board) for the center stile (27" length) 1/4" plywood (for backs) 1-1/4" pocket hole screws 3/4" finish nails edge banding for shelves 3/4 inch finish nails 1 1/4 inch pocket hole screws wood glue Tools:  measuring tape square pencil safety glasses hearing protection Kreg Jig™ drill compound miter saw table saw nailer sander Cut List Cut List:  CARCASS 2 - 3/4" plywood @ 22-1/4" x 34 1/2" (side panels - same on ALL BASES) 1 - 3/4" plywood @ 22-1/4" x 40" (bottom shelf) 2 - 3/4" plywood @ 5" x 40" (bottom supports) 2 - 3/4" plywood @ 3-1/2" (can vary in rip width) x 40" (top supports) 1 - 1/4" plywood @ 32" x 41-1/2" (back) FACE FRAME 2 - 1x2 @ 27" (side stile - same on ALL BASES) 1 - 1x6 @ 27" (center stile) 2 - 1x2 @ 42" (top/bottom rails - always overall width of cabinet) 1 - 1x2 @ 18" (drawer/door rail) SHELVES 3/4" plywood @ 22" x 39-3/4" (measure and adjust to fit shelf pins) DOOR/DRAWER FACE for FULL OVERLAY (1-1/4") 5 1/2" x 20-1/2" (drawer face) 22-1/2" x 20-1/2" (door) Step 1 For all the base cabinets, make sure the side panels are cut exactly the same as the other cabinets. Make sure you create the two sides for each cabinet in mirror - meaning the toekicks are on the bottoms, pocket holes for attaching face frames are on the outsides, and shelf pin holes are on the inside for adjustable shelves. Step 2 We used cheaper plywood (unfinished off the shelf oak) for these pieces because they are hidden underneath the cabinet. We ripped a bunch at 5" widths. All pocket holes are drilled on the 3/4" setting, and we used fine threaded pocket hole screws. Note that the toekick is cut 1/2" less than the front - see next diagram. Step 3 On top of the base supports, attach the bottom shelf. Step 4 For the top, we supported the front and back with strips of plywood leftover from ripping the sides. The width doesn't really matter of the boards, just getting the length right on. NOTE: Depending on how you mount your drawers, you may wish to add extra support to the back. Step 5 The backs aren't entirely necessary - we just liked that they finished out the inside. We nailed and glued on with short nails (3/4"). Step 6 The face frame overextends the sides by 1/4", but is flush to top and bottom (of toekick cutout) but overextends bottom shelf by 1/2". This leaves a 1/4" lip on inside of cabinet. I recommend building the face frame first with 3/4" pocket holes and 1-1/4" pocket hole screws, and then attaching the whole face frame to front with 1-1/4" pocket hole screws through holes predrilled on outsides of sides and top. On the bottom, you won't be able to get a drill in between the face frame and the bottom support board, so we nailed on the bottom with glue. Step 7 These are the size drawers/doors we ordered from Cabinet Now using 1-1/4" overlay concealed hinges (will do a post on hinges soon).  Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed. May I Suggest a Finish? Vintage Gray/Brown Stain on Pine Using Vaseline to Distress a Paint over Stain... Authentic Vintage Distressed Finish with Minwax...   1 of 9 ››

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