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Drainage

  1. How to Achieve Better Yard Drainage

    Stop dealing with water problems in your home and yard by installing this in-ground drainage system. This is a permanent, long-term solution to your wet yard. These step-by-step instructions and how-to photos walk you through the DIY installation. This project requires a lot of digging, but you won't have to deal with drainage issues ever again.

Other Projects for DIYers from The Family Handyman:

  1. How to Fix Gutters

    Project

    Seal leaky gutters and straighten sagging and bulging gutters. We'll show you how to restore good drainage and your self esteem at the same time.

Other Articles for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. Yard Drainage Solutions - What Would Bob Do? - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    Please help. My yard stays wet when it rains. I live in a subdivision with flat terrain. Is there a solution that doe...

  2. Bob Vila Radio: Driveway Drainage

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    There are lots of options available in driveway materials, including asphalt, gravel, brick and pavers. In addition t...

  3. Basement Waterproofing - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    Although structural problems are often to blame for wet basements, poor drainage or plumbing leaks can also trigger moisture or flooding. Here, a basement waterproofing pro reviews the likely culprits and how they can best be dealt with.

  4. The Basics: Raised Garden Bed - Bob's Blogs

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    [caption id="attachment_12654" align="aligncenter" width="405" caption="Photo: gronomics.com"][/caption] For the soil- and drainage -poor gardener, raised beds offer the opportunity to perfect yo...

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Other Videos for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. How to Drill Drainage Holes for Container Gardening

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    If your favorite pot isn't providing enough drainage , add a hole or two by following these simple steps.

  2. How to Build a Sub Irrigated Planter System

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    If you like fresh vegetables and herbs from the garden but don't think you can have a garden of your own, this is the project for you. The Family Handyman editor, Elisa Bernick shows you how to build a sub irrigated planter (also called a self-watering planter) that will allow you to grow your favorite foods and keep them watered, even while you are on vacation.

  3. Container Gardening Tips

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    The Family Handyman editor, Elisa Bernick shares hints and tips for container gardening to ensure you have beautiful, healthy potted plants.

  4. How to Grow Daffodils in Your Garden

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Daffodils, also known as Narcissus, are woodland plants that make a beautiful addition to any garden.

More »

Blog Posts

  1. Porch Copper Drainage System

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

     

  2. $10 Cedar Tiered Flower Planter or Herb Garden

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    make your own vertical tiered planter for flowers or herbs free plans ana-white.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  Hey DIY Friends!  I have a special treat for you today!!! We are sharing plans for a tiered planter, that we only spent $10 on!   And it gets even better!!! Remember I said we?   Well, this planter was actually built by my good friend Jen.  Jen considers herself a beginner builder, and she built this tiered planter in one hour from a new plan we worked on together (plans are following). Jen's going to be working with me on simple, small projects from my designs - like this one - so I'll let her take it from here! ------ Hi, I'm new to this so bear with me. My name is Jen and I am a mother of 3. I am the type of person that knows what I like when I see it, not so much a creator of something new. So when I started working for Ana I found myself online looking at all of these wonderful creations from others. I asked Ana if I could help her more and get into the building process. She is a great sport and of course said yes! I was excited to get to work, so she told me to come over and she'd come up with a simple plan for me to start. This planter is as easy as it gets! I got to work on it and in an hour I was looking at something I built! Such satisfaction and for $10 just plain exciting! The first box went together great, then I was cruising, the second box I ended up attaching the boards wrong, so attention to detail is important. I didn't worry too much because I wasn't out much and it was a reminder that I needed to slow down and chill out a little bit! The spacer came in handy to help keep the boxes evenly spaced and I didn't have an extra hand, just another step to simplify the process. Gotta say I love this Staple Gun. Once I made the supports flush to the top I shot them in and viola, I had the stand attached! Then I flipped this baby over and stood back to admire and couldn't believe how something so simple could make me so happy! Be sure to drill holes in the bottom to allow drainage . Time to get this baby planted, all hands on deck kiddos. They were so happy to help! We decided to keep the cedar natural so the step that usually takes the most time, the finishing, didn't even need to happen. The final result is a beautiful planter that is so versatile. I thought herbs would be nice, or instead of 2 traditional planters on each side of the sidewalk, two of these would be fun and give a different look. If you do decide to finish it, paint or stain goes a long way. A simple project with many options, that's what I'm talking about! I gotta say this is the most fun I've had in a long time! Can't wait to see what's next! Materials and Tools Shopping List:  3 - 5-1/2" wide cedar fence pickets 2 - 1x2 @ 8 feet long I used 1-1/4" galvanized staples to attach but you could also use screws or nails or other hardware Tools:  measuring tape pencil safety glasses hearing protection drill compound miter saw Cut List Cut List:  3 5 1/2" cedar fence picket @ 15" 6 5 1/2" cedar fence picket @ 5 1/2" 6 5 1/2" cedar fence picket @ 16" (cut last to fit) Step 1 Cut 5 1/2 " cedar fence picket for bottom first. Then attach both ends, cut sides last to fit. I used a Ryobi Airstrike Stapler and 1 1/4" galvanized for exterior staples. Make 3 of these boxes. Step 2 Attach both 1 x 2 @ 24" flush to back as shown on each side. Used the 1 1/4" staples. Step 3 Add 1 x 2 cross support 6" from bottom of outside 1 x 2's. Used staples to attach. Step 4 Cut 2 1x2's @ 27 3/4". Cut both ends 30 degrees parallel short point to long point. Make flush with top as shown. Attached with staples. Step 5 Now it's time to attach other 2 boxes to frame. I turned the project upside down and placed a scrap 1 x 3 board as a spacer to aid in attaching the first and second box. As shown in diagram, make box flush to front when attaching. Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

  3. Cedar Vertical Tiered Ladder Garden Planter

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    build your own ladder garden planter - free plans from ana-white.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  Hi everyone! Do you remember my friend Jen, who built this planter last week? Jen is a beginning builder, and will be working with me on beginner projects that are less expensive, easy, but still tons of fun! We are both so excited to debut a brand new plan today - a vertical garden ladder planter!  It's perfect for small backyards or even a tiny patio or balcony.  Even if you live in a small apartment in the city, you can still get your garden on! The total cost of this planter ladder was about $20 - compared to $239 for this one with just three tiers! I've asked Jen to share her tips and challenges as she built this tiered ladder planter - here's from Jen: ---- After the last project I couldn't wait to get started on this one. Another simple build with great results! What I like about this is it could be used as a regular flower planter, an herb planter, or as I did with herbs and flowers to mix it up a little. I got right to work and got all cuts done and layed out. Then I started attaching with the handy Ryobi AirStrike staple gun. Did I mention I love that thing! I'm pretty sure it's my new best friend - quick and easy, that's how I like it! The compound miter saw is great for the angled cuts. I needed 10 of the end pieces at 15 degrees off square, not parallel. Instead of adjusting the miter from side to side I simply made my first end cut, then used it as a template to mark the rest of the boards as I cut. Then all I needed to do instead of adjusting the saw is flip the board each time I cut. It worked much better than how I invisioned it would in my head. Once I had all the end pieces cut, I attached them to the sides with the staple gun.  After that I measured my opening and cut the bottom pieces as I went I shoved them in from the top, and there were my five boxes done. I shot a few staples for extra hold on the bottom pieces from the outside of each box. Now for the frame. I was a little intimidated by the top cut, but my saw was already set to 15 degrees, so I just wacked the ends off parallel as directed in the cut list. Then I used a carpenters square to cut the back off the tops, perpendicular to the 15 degree top cut.  It sounds complicated but it actually is easy.  TIP: If you don't have a carpenter's square, just use a scrap of wood or even a hardcover book. I didn't have a circular saw, so decided to use the jig saw to cut this part. I haven't really used a jig saw before, but all and all it went pretty well. I just took my time and was sure to stay on the outside edge of the line I had drawn. I won't like, the first cut wasn't perfect, but it worked. After the first upright was cut, I used it to trace the line on the second board. Then, once again, used the jig saw to cut on the traced line. This time it went even better. Practice makes perfect! Now came the time to attach the boxes to the frame. I started from the top and worked my way down. I marked my starting point on both uprights at the same time for consistency.  Then I screwed the box to one leg from the inside of the box, then placed the other leg and did the same.  First box down! Now I had a starting point for the rest of the boxes. So I cut a spacer at 6 inches (see photo below) to make the placing easier. Be sure to keep the spacer at an angle to follow the line of the first box attached. Once I had it placed I screwed the second box from the inside of the box to the frame, and so on and so forth with the rest of the boxes.  It made it easier to turn the frame on its side to place the screws. Clamps are your friend here if you don't have an extra hand. Now all I had to do was stand it up, and there was the finished product, a beautiful versatile vertical planter! Be sure to drill holes in the bottom of each box to allow for drainage . I drilled after it was all attached, but you could do it after building the boxes before attaching them to the frame. Now it was time to plant it! I showed my mother-in-law the planter and she loved it, so I decided it would look great in her back yard.  So off we went to get some flowers and herbs.  Turned out pretty well if you ask me! It's amazing what you can build with $20 bucks in lumber in a couple of hours! I hope you have as much fun building this as I did! --- Thanks Jen!  Of course, plans follow - please share your finished planter with us if you build!!! XO Ana + Family Materials and Tools Shopping List:  5 - 5-1/2" wide cedar fence pickets (dogeared is fine) 72" length 2 - 10' long 2x6 20 - 2-1/2" long exterior decking screws (for attaching boxes to legs) 1-1/4" galvanized nails or staples (for making boxes) Tools:  measuring tape square pencil safety glasses hearing protection drill jigsaw compound miter saw staple gun Cut List Cut List:  10 - 2x6 @ 5-1/4" both ends cut at 15 degrees off square, ends are NOT parallel 10 - 5-1/2" wide cedar fence pickets @ 23-1/2" 5 - 5-1/2" wide cedar fence pickets @ 20-1/2" (cut to fit) 2 - 2x6 @ 68-3/8" both ends cut at 15 degrees off square, ends ARE parallel Step 1 Attach two of the longer cedar fence picket pieces to two ends. I used 1-1/4" galvanized staples, but you could also use screws or nails. Step 2 I placed the bottoms in from the top, and then added a few staples to keep them in place. Step 3 The sides are simply cut with ends parallel at 15 degrees, then the back is cut off perpendicular to the top 15 degree cut. It's easier than you'd think. I used a jigsaw but the right tool would have been a circular saw. Start your cut on the top as you will have more to bit into. Step 4 Mark the placement of the top planter on both legs first to make sure you place the planter in exactly the same spot on both legs. Then I attached from inside with 2-1/2" exterior decking screws. The 2x6s I used were very hard to drill into, so I ended up predrilling as well. Step 5 Then I used the spacer block (just a scrap piece of wood) cut at 6" long to help me space the planters as I attached them. Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

  4. Flag Inspired Outdoor Wood Coffee Table

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    DIY Flag inspired outdoor coffee table! Free step by step tutorial from Ana-White.com About Project Author Notes:  Happy Flag Day!!! In celebration of Independance Day coming up, and because we love stars and strips, our family built an American Flag Inspired Outdoor Coffee table. We love how this coffee table adds a vintage Americana feel to our back deck.  I thought our new sectional (new plans on their way to you very soon!) would be the center of our deck .... but this new coffee table really is the most loved! You'll be amazed at how easy it is to build this coffee table.   The top is made of slats for water drainage .  But because there's a gap between the top boards, painting the top was so easy, my little helper could stay in the lines. Next week, I'll share with you the step by step finishing tutorial so you can paint your own American Flag Inspired outdoor coffee table. But first you have to build it! Plans follow! Have a great weekend! XO Ana and Family Love this? Hope you pin it!

  5. Replacing An Acorn Roof Finial

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

     

  6. Tar Paper Facts and Tips

    Blog

    FromAsk the Builder

    Tar paper has been time-tested as a weather barrier. Normally used on roofs, tar paper makes a great barrier for the exterior walls of your housing, building or shed. Tar paper keeps the wood beneath it dry.

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