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Polyurethane

  1. How to Apply Polyurethane

    Getting a smooth, blemish-free finish with oil-based polyurethane is within your grasp if you follow the steps in this article. Oil-based polyurethane varnish brings out the wood’s natural beauty or wood grain. Our 4-step approach shows you how to apply the varnish successfully. A good-quality natural-bristle brush, a reasonably dust-free, well ventilated space and some patience are all you need.

Other Projects for DIYers from The Family Handyman:

  1. Water-Based vs. Oil-Based Polyurethane Floor Finish

    Project

    Find out which finish is the best for you project, water-based or oil based polyurethane . They're both durable and good looking, but there are differences. We'll help you decide.

  2. How to Use Oil-Based Polyurethane Over Water-Based Polyurethane

    Project

    Recoating a water-based acrylic floor finish with oil-based polyurethane is not usually a problem, so long as the old finish is properly buffed and cleaned before applying the new finish.

  3. Polyurethane Finish: Good vs. Bad

    Project

    Water or oil-based polyurethane that's been sitting on a shelf and has skinned over can often still be used for natural finishes, as long as the liquid underneath is in good condition.

  4. How to Get a Smooth Polyurethane Finish

    Project

    These tips and techniques for applying oil-based polyurethane produce virtually flawless results. They include using a roller, using wipe-on poly and above all controlling dust.

  5. Water Based Finishing Tips

    Project

    A professional woodworker shares his tips for applying water-based polyurethane over raw or stained wood, and shows how to get great finishes every time.

  6. Spray Finishing on Wood

    Project

    Aerosol cans of shellac, lacquer and polyurethane allow you to quickly apply a finish on small or complex projects that's free of brush marks. Learn the basic techniques that guarantee a good finish.

Other Articles for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. Prefinished vs. Unfinished Wood Flooring

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    I’ve looked at flooring from both sides now. . . and it’s the horrors of applying polyurethane I recall. Apologies to...

  2. Victorian Kitchen & Bath Remodel : Spray-On Closed-Cell Insulation - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    Bob meets with Don Schumacher (from NCFI), who explains polyurethane spray-on insulation. Applied directly to the back of sheathing, it swells to 25 times its liquid volume, creating foam filled with microscopic bubbles that impede air movement.

  3. DIY Repurposed Window Headboard - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    At BobVila. com, we love an old window. No, really. And this repurposed window headboard from Liz Marie puts one of o...

  4. Tree Stump Ideas - 5 Things You Can Make - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    After you cut down a tree, you're left with an unsightly, sad-looking stump. What on earth can you do with that? Here are 5 tree stump ideas to consider.

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Other Videos for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. How to Refinish Closet Doors

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    If your closet doors are looking a little shabby, you can refinish them yourself and get them looking new again.

  2. Painting Your Home with Acrylic House Paint

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Tim Carter, from AsktheBuilder.com, demonstrates why acrylic house paint is one to consider for your home.

  3. How to Paint a House Exterior

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Tim Carter, of http://AsktheBuilder.com, demonstrates the proper way to paint a house.

  4. Eco-Friendly Insulation Tips

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Learn how to turn a home into eco friendly condos using insulation.

More »

Blog Posts

  1. Three Story American Girl or 18" Dollhouse

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    free diy American Girl or 18 inch dollhouse plans - 3 story. Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  I built a house and painted it this past week. Granted, it was a dollhouse.   But it is a HUGE dollhouse. Yes, huge.   For years, Grace has been asking us for a dollhouse for her American Girl or 18" dolls, but I've resisted, knowing how big these dollhouses have to be for Kit Kitridge and Ruthie to fit inside.   But Grace has been begging and begging and leaving for school, saying, "Mom, can you work on my dollhouse today?" or "I'll hold brother so you can work on my dollhouse." How do you say no to that? I couldn't, so this is what I've been up to (in the couple of minutes here when the baby allows me to work on projects) ... We cut the plywood into strips 23-3/4" wide (have your home improvement store do this for you if you don't have a table saw or a truck) and then I used my Ryobi Cordless Circular Saw to cut the tops into the house shape.  I really like this saw because it's lightweight, has a handy laser on the front, and matches the battery of my drill.  That, and it's super affordable and works great! Then to cut the doors and windows out, I drew the windows and doors out on each of the panels, and then drilled holes on each side, inside the lines, Then it's just a matter of connecting the dots, With a jigsaw. Cutting out the windows and doors was probably the most time consuming part of this whole project. I used a Kreg Jig to assemble the pieces.  There's not alot of joints, but because the pieces are so huge, it was a little cumbersome - but nothing I couldn't manage on my own (the hubs is busy taking care of the baby while I worked on this project). Then I built window trim to fit, stapling it together with my Ryobi AirStrike stapler and glue.   I'm not the best jigsaw-er in the world (or even in my own house) but the window trim really hid any imperfections. Our happy client made a few requests that aren't in this plan - we did not add the bottom trim and used caster wheels instead.  And instead of the two rooms upstairs, we made one full room upstairs (but had to add a 1x2 at the top to support the 1/4" plywood on the back. I also added veneer edge banding to all exposed plywood edges to finish them off. For the floors inside the dollhouse, we wanted to keep the wood, so we used Rustoleum Wood Stain in Dark Walnut. It's a one step - just apply and wipe off.  Easy enough for my seven year old to help out! We also applied RustOleum polyurethane over the stain to protect the floors (just like a real wood floor!!!). Then we taped over the floors with painter's tape (until we ran out and had to use duct tape) and newspaper, A quick sanding, and she's ready for primer! Jacob sprayed the dollhouse with primer, And then I painted carefully the blue exterior paint on the outsides. We LOVED how it turned out!!!! But we wanted the roof to stand out a little more, So I picked up some RustOleum textured spray paint and sprayed the roof.  It loos like roofing!!! Of course, Grace loved the dollhouse!!! Now we get to furnish it!! The plans for this dollhouse follow, hope you like them! XO Ana + Fam Materials and Tools Shopping List:  2 - sheets 3/4" plywood or MDF 1 - sheet 1/4" plywood or MDF (for back) 6 - 1x4 @ 12 feet long (add another one for the base if desired) 4 - 1x2 @ 8 feet long 1-1/4" pocket hole screws 1-1/4" finish nails or staples Tools:  measuring tape square safety glasses hearing protection Kreg Jig™ drill circular saw jigsaw nailer sander Cut List Cut List:  WALLS AND FLOORS 3 - 3/4" plywood or MDF @ 23-3/4" x 73" (sides and center divider) 1 - 3/4" plywood or MDF @ 23-3/4" x 48" (bottom) 4 - 3/4" plywood or MDF @ 23-3/4" x 22-7/8" (upper floors) ROOF 5 - 1x4 @ 49-1/2" (OR 1- 3/4" plywood @ 49-1/2" x 17-1/2" (measure and cut to fit)) 1 - 1x4 @ 49-1/2" 2 - 1x4 @ 14-3/4" BACK 1 - 1/4" plywood @ 48" x 61-1/2" WINDOWS - CUT TO FIT Step 1 First, cut out all the pieces. If you don't have a truck or tablesaw, it might be easier to have your home improvement store rip your plywood into 22-3/4" widths, 8 feet long. Then cut the longest pieces first. The top roof angle is 45 degrees. You can easily find this by finding the center of your side and middle panels (at the top). This distance should be 11-7/8" from the sides. Then measure down 11-7/8", and draw a diagonal between the two points. Then mark out all windows and doors and cut out with a jigsaw. Step 2 Once the pieces are cut, attach the floor to the walls. I used a Kreg Jig set at 3/4" and 1-1/4" pocket hole screws. Step 3 Next, add the floors. I used 3/4" pocket holes on the underside and 1-1/4" pocket hole screws. Step 4 Because we opted for one large room on the top floor, I opted to use plywood for my roof (no center support without the divided upper room). Keep top edge flush as you attach room with glue and finish nails or staples. Step 5 I built my front roof first with 3/4" pocket holes and 1-1/4" pocket hole screws, and then attached to front of dollhouse with finish nails and glue. Step 6 For the back, I used 1/4" plywood and nailed it to all of the walls and floors with glue. Step 7 We opted for caster wheels instead, but you could also finish out the base with 1x boards. Shown in the diagram is 1x4s. Step 8 I measured each window and built the window trim to fit snugly, gluing in place when I was done. Step 9 I haven't added shutters yet, but this is what 1x2 shutters would look like. Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

  2. Gorilla Glue Single Use Tubes

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

      Gorilla Glue Single Use Tubes Of Polyurethane   I’ve been waiting a long time for Gorilla Glue Single Use Tubes.  Gorilla Glue is well known for their multi-use polyurethane glue its... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

  3. Step-by-Step to Finishing Steps

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    Author Notes Remember when the Momplex stairs used to look like this? Good news!  We can officially put the white can of paint down because all the painting is done on our quest for the ever popular wood-treads-white-risers staircase.   You know what I'm talking about. One of my favorite parts of the wood on white staircase is the contrast between the white moulding and risers against the stained treads - making the steps easy for Mom to see.  It’s also super functional this way - the crisp white will stay crisp white, while the wood treads will take years of use without showing paint chipping or scratching. I have to admit, I didn't hate the reclaimed wood stair treads we've been using durning the consturction phase.  But they aren't Mom's favorite, so I'll have to find another use for them.  They are going to be replaced by finished wood treads. But before we get to actually pulling the construction treads out and replacing them with wood treads, we have to finish the wood treads.  To get the wood treads to last through years of use, we partnered up with our friends at Minwax , using their stains and special polyurethane designed for floors.   Read on, and I’ll show you step by step - literally - how we finished these steps!  

  4. Installing Decorative Fypon Millwork

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

    Installing Polyurethane Decorative Millwork When your looking to define the character of your homes architectural detail or simply trying to match old details installing decorative Fypon millwork is... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

  5. Elmers ProBond Advanced Glue

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

    Elmers ProBond Advanced Polyurethane Glue The folks at Elmers just released a new glue that is touted to be the first multi-purpose adhesive that delivers professional strength and versatility... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

  6. Tackle Small Jobs with Single Use Gorilla Glue

    Blog

    FromCharles and Hudson

    Gorilla Glue can be used for all types of household repairs and they've just introduced a new single use tube that holds 3 grams which is perfect for small jobs and is easy to store in a drawer.

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