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Sanding

  1. Building a Drum Sander Table

    Improvise a low-cost drum sander using your drill press and a custom sanding table with dust collection. Build it in an hour from scrap wood.

Other Projects for DIYers from The Family Handyman:

  1. The Best Sander for Finishing Cabinets

    Project

    It's hard to know what type of sander to buy for your projects. We’ll take the confusion out of buying a sander for finishing kitchen cabinets and explain why a random orbital sander is the best choice.

  2. Drywall/Sheetrock Sanding Is Time Well Spent

    Project

    Sanding drywall isn’t exactly fun. But if you do it right, you’ll be rewarded with a great-looking paint job that will make all the effort worthwhile. These tips will help you avoid common drywall sanding mistakes so you can get the best results possible from all your hard work.

  3. Drywall Sanding Tips and Techniques

    Project

    In this article, we'll show you how to avoid common sanding mistakes and offer several tips for getting the best results from your drywall sanding job. Sanding drywall is tedious, dusty work. But if you do it right, you'll be rewarded with a great-looking paint job that will make all the effort worthwhile.

  4. Hardwood Floor Sanding : Do It Yourself Tips

    Project

    Follow these hardwood floor sanding and refinishing tips from a veteran floor refinisher to achieve a smooth, professional-quality finish.

  5. Sanding Stainless Steel Appliances

    Project

    Buff out ugly scratches in your shiny stainless steel appliances, using fine sandpaper and rubbing compound.

  6. Wet-Sanding Drywall

    Project

    Drywall is a better material than MDF (medium density fiberboard) for walls because its joints are less likely to crack. Wet sand to avoid dust.

  7. How to Refinish Hardwood Floors

    Project

    Renew a wood floor in half the time and at half the expense of sanding . The secret is to screen the old finish. Read on to see if screening will work for your floor.

  8. How to Sand Drywall

    Project

    After you've hung and taped drywall, follow these steps to sand it perfectly smooth. We'll show you techniques the pros use to get sanding done quickly with excellent results.

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Other Articles for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. Dremel bottle cap sander

    Article

    FromInstructables: exploring - workshop - featured

    Riseabove has a wonderful tutorial on how to convert your Dremel into a micro mini disc sander for jewelry. I had been looking for a way to setup my own sanding system and after alot of research and experimenting, I came across hers and couldn't wait to try it. There was only one problem: the ...

  2. Sanding Wood - Bob Vila's Blogs

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    Sanding is the unsung hero of any project with wood. It can take a long time, and the results are subtle: Sanding wood does not transform your workpiece in the way that cutting it to size does.

  3. Bob Vila Radio: Tool Tip - Power Sanders

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    Good sanding can make or break a woodworking project, so every do-it-yourselfer should have a power sander in the wor...

  4. DIY Drum Sander

    Article

    FromInstructables: exploring - workshop - woodworking - featured

    This is only a short guide to help with something a don't like doing Sanding I think sanding is not the most interesting part of the project, unfortunately its the part that can either make or break the look of the finished job. On several occasions I have found a need to sand around corners o... By: HUKBMBEAR Continue Reading »

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Other Videos for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. Sanding Wood Part6: Dust Collection

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Another reason to use a random orbital sander – dust collection. The Family Handyman editor, Travis Larson, will show you how to secure your shop vacuum to your sander where it wont fall off while you are sanding . Keeping the dust off your work piece will make your sander work more efficiently and keep your lungs dust-free.

  2. Sanding Hardwood Floors – Well, Sort of

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Tom Baker submitted this video in one of The Family Handyman's video contests. He will show you why you should wear a helmet when sanding hardwood floors with a belt sander .

  3. Why Use a Sanding Sealer

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Applying a sanding sealer to your raw project is a great way to seal the surface and allow your final topcoats to lay on the wood much smoother and with finer luster.

  4. Why You Need a Surface Sander

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    George Vondriska demonstrates the benefits of using a surface sander .

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Blog Posts

  1. Eighteen Hours of Floor Sanding : A Video Diary

    Blog

    FromDIY Diva

    So, how was your weekend? Did you injure your left butt muscle lifting a two hundred pound sander into your vehicle after eighteen hours of sanding ? No? Weird. Must just...

  2. Dueling DIY: Stair Sanding , and More Sanding , and More Sanding

    Blog

    FromDIY Diva

    You’ll never guess what I’ve been doing on my stairs. Yeah, actually… not that hard to guess. I put a little time in on Saturday working on priming the banister...

  3. 10 Tips for Building Tabletops

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    Tips on building a tabletop from Ana-White.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  You can build a nice tabletop with a drill, saw and a Kreg Jig. Here's my top 10 tips for building your own tabletop with a DIYers set of tools. If you've got more tips to add, please do so in the comments - we'd love to hear your tips and tricks too! Step 1 Build Tabletop First Build your tabletop before your table base, if you can. Because board widths can vary, sometimes your tabletop comes out a little smaller (or bigger) than you intended. If your base isn't built yet, you can alter the base size to fit the tabletop you built. Of course, you can always cut down a too big tabletop, or add more boards to make a small tabletop larger. Step 2 Plan Your Tabletop to Minimize Scrap If you are building a table without a plan, consider designing your tabletop size so there's minimal board waste. For example, you can get three 31-3/4" cuts out of an 8 foot long board. Or two 47-3/4" long cuts out of an 8 foot long board. That said, if I had to choose between less scrap boards and getting the tabletop size that perfectly fits my space, I'd go for the perfect tabletop size. Just because it's scrap doesn't' mean it's waste. Step 3 Find the Happy Medium on Board Widths Consider building your tabletop out of boards about 6" wide (1x6 or 2x6), or close in size (I use x4 and x8 boards on occasion). If you go smaller, you'll be adding more joints, which means more pocket holes and more sanding . If you go with a wider board, the board itself may cup over time, creating high and low points on your tabletop. I personally find x6 boards to be that happy medium. Step 4 Cut Your Boards Long Cut your boards a little long. Then when you go to assemble your tabletop, build it so one end of the boards are flush, but the opposite ends are long (and most likely uneven). Then when you finishing joining your boards, you can go back and trim the uneven long ends for a perfect tabletop. TIP: To save on cutting when your tabletop is 48" (or half the length of your boards), simply cut a 8 foot board in half. Join the boards, with the cut edges flush, and then trim the uncut factory ends off square. TIP: To help you attach boards square on one end, clamp a square board to your tabletop, perpendicular to the tabletop boards. As you assemble the tabletop, keep one end of the boards flush to the clamped board. Step 5 Start with Square Edges If you can, purchase S4S boards, meaning all four sides are square and the board is ready for your to build with. If you have rounded edges on your boards, use a tablesaw to rip the edges square on your boards. It's always nice to work with square edges. That said, planked tabletops with grooves in between are very "in" right now, if that's the look you are going for. Step 6 Preventing Cupping That square board you are about to build a tabletop with used to be part of a round tree. Over time, your boards may cup, meaning the center of the board - widthwise - may rise or fall inward, simply because the grain of the wood is curved. To prevent your entire tabletop from cupping one way, alternative the end grain of your boards. Step 7 Use Pocket Holes to Join Board on Underside I wish we all had a joiner and a planer and a biscuit joiner at our disposal - but the good news is you can still use a pocket hole jig to build a very nice tabletop (the same tool you'll use to build the table's base). Drill pocket holes along one edge of all but one of the boards. Start with the board that has no pocket holes and work outward, attaching with pocket holes. Use clamps to ensure your joints are even, and work off a level surface. Use glue between the boards, but make sure you wipe off excess glue (glue will prevent stain from soaking in). Step 8 Strongbacks We call them strongbacks and we use them on every tabletop we build. It's just a scrap strip of 3/4" plywood, with 3/4" pocket holes drilled about ever few inches. The strongback is attached to the bottom of the tabletop as the glue dries. The square edge of the plywood prevents the tabletop from warping or cupping as it dries. Then we remove the strongbacks (and save them for the next tabletop) when we attach the tabletop to the base. TIP: If you are concerned about cupping, consider cutting to fit permanent strongbacks, hidden on the underside of your tabletop. Step 9 Sanding Sanding is definitely a dirty word around here. If you are sanding a tabletop, you are going to come back covered in sanding dust. We use a belt sander for the first sanding , using the belt sander to minimize any differences in height between boards. Be careful to only sand in the direction of the wood grain. Any cross marks might not be discernible until you go to stain the tabletop. After the belt sander , we finish the tabletop with a palm sander in a fine grit sandpaper. Of course, I sand between coats of poly too, so don't put that sandpaper away just yet. Step 10 Attaching the Tabletop I love being able to use pocket holes to attach a tabletop from the underside, so no screw holes are showing. This works great for projects that have plywood sides or large aprons, or small tabletops. But when you get a much larger tabletop (especially ones with small aprons or no plywood underneath)- you've got more opportunity for movement. A small cupping across each board can become substantial across an entire tabletop. Consider attaching your tabletop with tabletop fastners. You just make a small cut in the aprons with a circular saw, insert the tabletop fastner (also called Z-Clip) in the cut, and attach other end to the underside of the tabletop. Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

  4. Easy Vintage Step Stool

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    Easy vintage step stool plans from Ana-White.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  Grandma is expecting a lot of company up at the Momplex this Christmas, and quite a few of those guests aren't quite tall enough to reach the sink. These are also the same guests that tend to have sticky fingers from making gingerbread houses and sneaking sugar cookies, and need easy access to the sink. So I thought I'd put together a little step stool - one that is super simple to build - as I'm in the "any day now" stage of this pregnancy, and I literally wake up, say "hey, I'm not in labor today, so what can I do - and finish - by the end of today."   This stool might look a little complicated, but I promise you - if you can squeeze a jigsaw trigger, you can make it.  It's just sides cut from a 1x12, a 1x12 bottom step, a 1x6 top step, and some 1x2s in there for extra support.  Once you get it cut out, it's like 10 minutes to make. It's got a full, wide bottom step, so I have found myself even using it.   The kids really like the top step for getting to the sink.  If you need a quick but nice Christmas gift for a little one this year, this might be a plan for you!  It looks expensive and complicated, but it really isn't! For the finish, I was contacted by Glidden (I write for MyColortopia - Glidden's color inspiration site) to test out their new paint, called Glidden Trim and Door .  This new paint is an oil based paint that claims to be self leveling, one coat, and a thick, shiny enamel finish - that doesn't DRIP or leave brush marks.   A project like this step stool, with lots of tight spots to paint (pretty much screaming brush marks and dripping), and guaranteed to get lots of wear and tear, needs an exceptional painted finish, so I thought I'd give it a try!  See what all the hype is about! Because Glidden Trim and Paint is an oil based paint, and I'm currently preggers, I enlisted the help of one of my friends, Jen, to paint the step stool for me. Excuse the sawdust on the belly .... Jen got right to work sanding my jigsaw cuts with a coarse sanding pad. Our power sander won't sand a curvd cut, so these sanding pads work pretty good. Another note - I was able to get a pretty good jigsaw cut on the two sides by using a fresh wood blade and clamping the two sides together and cutting as one.  This really helps minimize the need for sanding . Then just to even everything out and prepare for primer, Jen sanded the entire project with medium grit sandpaper, and then went over the entire project lightly with fine sandpaper.   I know, she's a good friend! After vacuuming the step stool ... we are ready for primer! The Glidden Trim and Door paint does function as a primer, but here's my reasoning: Primer is cheaper than paint.  And it's cheap insurance.  Most primers will work with an oil based paint - but read the can just to make sure. Now for the paint!!! I'll admit, I was a little nervous when I peeked in the paint room and took a look in the can - the paint seperates out so you must mix it.  Nothing a little gentle stirring can't fix. Jen described the paint as "thick" and was nervous about applying it because usually you plan on several thin coats - not one goopy thick coat - right? Well, this little step stool got one goopy thick coat ...  That never dripped or dribbled, Or showed a brush mark.   And when it dried, we were all super impressed with how thick and shiny the paint was, and how professional looking the one goopy coat ended up looking.  Even in our dark Alaska days, the finish reflects it's so shiny! So that's what all the hype is about! I definitely say give it a try for a project that is going to get lots of wear and tear, and you need a shiny, hard finish - benches, tabletops, doors, trim - I'm already counting down the days until spring to paint my exterior wood trim with it. Of course, plans for this step stool follow!  Enjoy!  XO Ana Disclosure: This post is written in collaboration with our friends at Glidden, but all opinions and comments are my own. Materials and Tools Shopping List:  4 feet of 1x12 boards 18" of 1x6 boards 6 feet of 1x2 boards I used 1-1/4" pocket hole screws and 2" finish nails and glue Tools:  measuring tape square pencil safety glasses hearing protection Kreg Jig™ drill jigsaw compound miter saw nailer sander Cut List Cut List:  2 - 1x12 @ 12-1/4" - long point measurement, one end is cut at 5 degrees off square (sides) 1 - 1x6 @ 17" (top step) 4 - 1x2 @ 15" (supports) 1 - 1x12 @ 15" (bottom step) Step 1 Take the two side pieces and clamp them together. Use the measurments in the diagram to find the points and draw the curves. I used a jar lid to help me get the curves right. Then I carefully cut the sides out with a jigsaw, using a wood blade, and going slow, making sure my blade didn't bevel as I cut. Step 2 NOTE: The order of assembly in these instructions is more friendly to pocket hole users. If you use a different type of assembly for joints, you may wish to alter the order of assembly. The first thing I did was drill 2 pocket holes (3/4" setting) on each inside top of the sides (REMEMBER THEY ARE IN MIRROR!!!) and attached the top step. Make sure you leave 15" between the two sides, as all the other boards are cut 15" in width. Step 3 Working down from the top, I then added the two top supports. Step 4 And then I added the bottom step - it's just a 1x12. Step 5 Finally, I added the two bottom step supports. And that's it! Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed. May I Suggest a Finish? Whitewash Stained Finish Painting White Outdoor Adirondack Projects Medium Warm Stain   1 of 9 ››

  5. Tall Panel Headboard - QUEEN

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    Tall panel headboard using baseboard trim and moulding - no routing required! Free plans from Ana-White.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  We are so thankful that Mom let us build her a new headboard for her room up at the Momplex.  It was a fun project to work on, and we really love how it turned out!!! We (the Ram and I) went super tall with this headboard (over six feet!), so it really breaks up the room and adds some much needed architectural interest to what is otherwise just four plain walls. And why not go super tall when you DIY a headboard?  It's the same amount of work, just a little longer boards! Because of the grand height of this headboard, there won't be a need to do much decorating on this wall or over the headboard.   We opted to paint the headboard the same color as the moulding, trim and doors in the room to make it easy for Mom to update the room throughout the year. The white also makes the room appear larger and brighter - always a bonus up here in Alaska when the sun gets so scarce (forgive the grainy photos - we are sunlight deprived right now). And who doesn't love a project that can make a preggers lady in her last month look (somewhat) normal sized, right??? (thanks for being kind!) This lady sure does!!! It totally made our day that Mom loved her new handmade headboard!!!  I guess the only question left is what nightstand should we build to match? Well, pending our newest carpenter doesn't make an early arrival. To build this headboard, I collaborated my awesome friends over at 3MDIY to be safe and to make sure we gave this headboard the best possible finish. Well, here's my accessories - I love 3M™ Safety Products , especially these 3M Tekk WorkTunes Ear Muffs! And I also love the orange earplugs - they work great too! We have a pretty good sawdust collection system set up (finally broke down and invested in a system since we build constantly) in our workspace (it's a dream come true, I tell you!) so sawdust isn't a huge issues for us, but a respirator is also recommended when cutting. To build this headboard, first I started with a general sketch (got you covered with the full free plans below) My most favorite way to build is with my Kreg Jig , so we circled all the spots we would need pocket holes, And started drilling pocket holes.  The Ram's on photography duty this time - but he's building too.   We clamp every joint, whenever possible.  You drive each joint just once, might as well do it right, right? When the joints are clamped, it's a no brainer - just drive the screws! After we got the frame for the headboard built, we added 3/4" PureBond Plywood for the main panel.  We chose PureBond because it's North American made, substainably harvested and formaldehyde free. I really wanted a plywood panel because it will help keep the boards from warping, and will resist shrinking and expanding over time. That, and it sure is pretty!!!   Here's the main headboard done, we just have to add moulding now! We have a pile of leftover moudling from trimming out the Momplex , so we used baseboard and header moulding .  But really - you could use just about anything to dress up your headboard. Our header moulding ended up being just shy of corvering the top 2x4, so we threw a 1x2 board in, mitering the corners. The moulding is just glued and nailed down.  I used 2" finish nails to attach through the 1x2. Then we attached the header moulding underneath the 1x2s.  This really made the moulding look more substantial and grand too! Then for the panels, we used 1" nails and glue to attach 5-1/4" tall baseboard, mitering corners.  It's the exact same baseboard we used for trimming out the floor at the Momplex. So how do we take rough, knotty 2x4 studs mixed with leftover moulding, and make it look like this: It's pretty simple, really.   You just gotta have the right tools for the job! I used  3M Advanced Abrasives  in varying grits to sand, and  3M Wood Filler    to hide imperfections in the wood and fill nail or screw holes. I filled all the nail holes with  3M Wood Filler   And also all knots and cracks in the 2x4s with more 3M Wood Filler   Then I gave the headboard a good sanding with  3M Advanced Abrasives     sanding paper, starting with a medium, and working up to super fine. For the moulding, I used a small piece of 3M Advanced Abrasives  sandpaper to get in all spots too small for a power sander . Then we cleaned the headboard up, getting rid of all sanding residue (it's the enemy when you paint!). All ready for paint!!! The Ram painted the headboard with his sprayer, stealing my  3M™ Safety Products   (that's fine with me!) Can you see how shiny that paint is???  Good sanding does that! After we let the headboard fully dry, we moved it up the stairs into the room, EEEK!!! And then attached a bed frame to the headboard.  Mom had a boxspring, and with how little the room is, we opted not to do a footboard or full wood bed frame, and just use the metal bed frame. NOTE: Due to the height of this headboard, to prevent forward tipping, it is also recommended to attach it to a stud in the wall at the top.  L brackets will do the trick. The metal bed frame just bolts right to the headboard with lag bolts. Mom says she feels like she's staying in a fancy hotel with the new headboard! Don't tell her we only spent about $100 on the headboard, okay?  That'll just be between us. And of course, the plans follow - so you can build this headboard too!!! This post is a collaboration with 3M DIY. To keep up-to-date on projects, products and sampling visit 3MDIY.com. You can also connect with 3M DIY socially: 3M DIY Twitter Page 3M DIY Facebook Page 3M DIY YouTube Page Materials and Tools Shopping List:  5 - 2x4 @ 8 feet or stud length 1 - 1x4 @ 10 feet long 1 - 1x4 @ 4 feet long (cut the 41" long board out of this one) 1 - full sheet of 3/4" finished plywood 24 feet of 5-1/4" baseboard moulding (you'll need quite a bit extra to get those miter cuts to work) 6 feet of header moulding or crown moudling 1 - 1x2 @ 8 feet long (optional for stacked header moulding) 1-1/4" and 2-1/2" pocket hole screws 2" and 1" finish nails wood glue Tools:  measuring tape square pencil safety glasses hearing protection Kreg Jig™ drill circular saw compound miter saw nailer Cut List Cut List:  2 - 2x4 @ 72-1/2" (legs) 1 - 2x4 @ 56" (top header) 2 - 2x4 @ 56" (panel trim on front) 1 - 1x4 @ 41" (center panel trim on front) 1 - 3/4" plywood @ 48" x 56" (center panel) 1 - 2x4 @ 67" (top) 5-1/4" baseboard moulding cut to fit header moulding cut to fit optional 1x2 cut to fit Step 1 IMPORTANT: Due to the height of this headboard, you must secure the top to studs in the wall to prevent forward tipping. Start by attaching the legs to the top 2x4. NOTE: Also drill 1-1/2" pocket holes facing upward for attaching the top 2x4 in later steps. Step 2 Next, attach the 1x4 pieces, all flush to the front. Step 3 Then attach the center 1x4 - you may wish to measure and cut this piece to fit as 1x4s can vary in width. Step 4 Cut the back plywood to fit, and attach to legs and header. Also attach to the front 1x4 boards with 1-1/4" screws (we just used pocket hole screws so we didn't have to buy special screws). Step 5 Next, attach the header - use the 1-1/2" pocket holes you drilled in step 1, with 2-1/2" pocket hole screws. There's a 2" overhang to the front and ends. Step 6 Next, attach moudling inside the 1x4 frames, mitering corners. Step 7 Finally, attach crown moulding or header moulding to the top. IMPORTANT: Due to the height of this headboard, you must secure the top to studs in the wall to prevent forward tipping. Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed. May I Suggest a Finish? Easiest Stain Ever with Minwax Stain Cloths Rustic Yet Refined Wood Finish Minwax Water Based Stain - Gray   1 of 9 ››

  6. Master Closet Tower for Sewing Mom Momplex Unit

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    Closet tower plans from Ana-White.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  So we've been saying for months - make that years - that when we get one Mom moved in at the Momplex , we are going to take a break, not touch a tool, and do nothing for weeks. Well, I lasted exactly one whole day. One whole day of hanging out around the house, folding laundry, watching tv, and making sure every dirty dish got immediately put in the dishwasher ... and that's about all I could take.  It was torture for me. I cannot just live a life of maintaining.  I have a fundemental need, addiction, whatever you want to call it, to improve and make things.  My aunt always says everyone needs a creative outlet.  Some of us might need a creative eight lane freeway. So after a day of not working, guess where I went? Back to work. Yes, I have a problem.  I know. There's no closet organizer in the master closet up at the Momplex. And that just keeps me up at night. So first, I measured the closet, And sketched out a quick layout for the closet.  It's a long, narrow closet, so I decided to just do shelving along the one wall.  The opposite wall has a window, and the door swings into it, so it's pretty much not going to do much work.  On the far wall, I could have turned the corner with the closet, but everything I've ever heard is corners in closets are very difficult to use.  So we'll put a mirror at the end of the closet. With an overall closet span of over 9 feet, we'll need something to break the span up - and also provide more organization and shelving for Mom. So I sketched up a tower using plywood sides and a face frame with a little decorative header.  I know this is just a closet tower, but really, it's not a ton more work to make it look nicer, be more structurally sound, and last longer - so I put in the extra effort. The plans for this closet tower follow - so scroll down if you want to build this tower for your own closet. I opted to use PureBond plywood for this closet, to match the rest of the Momplex, and because it's formaldehyde free, made with soy-based adhesives instead, and made right here in North America - and it's pretty!   I ripped it down into strips, 15 3/4" wide on the table saw.  My friends at 3MDIY.com sent me a set of 3M™ Tekk Digital headphones so I can listen to my favorite tunes (wondering if I can tune it to a baby monitor too???) while working - and of course eye protection. We have a dust collector hooked up to the table saw so there's not a big sawdust problem where we cut, but I'd also recommend a 3M™ mask (especially if you were cutting plywood made with formaldehyde in it). Once all the pieces were cut, I used my Kreg Jig to build the basic box and face frame, And then tacked some trim on with my Ryobi nailer. And what do you know??? I built a closet tower!!! No matter how big or small the project, I love that feeling of seeing your finished project all put togehter.  But we all know, building is the easy part.  It's the finish that takes the time and work. Even though I had taken my time cutting the header out with a jigsaw, it's a jigsaw - it doesn not cut a perfectly smooth curved cut.  You still have to sand it. Using a power sander can quickly take off too much, leaving you with an uneven header.  A sanding block is square, so it's difficult to sand curved cuts with it. 3M Sanding Pads to the rescue! Now that's more like it! Where I nailed the face frame and trim on, there were some nail holes showing.  A little dab of 3M Wood Filler , And then a quick all over sanding after the wood filler dried (used 3M Advanced Abrasives Sandpaper in varying grits) And she's ready for paint! Oh yes, she's definitely a she! Since I'm preggers, and we live in Alaska where it's currently -30F and painting outdoors in not an option, the Ram was kind enough to paint this project for me, and haul it up to the closet .... I squealed when I saw it in the closet!!!   Yes, I am that girl that squeals about closet organizers instead of what is IN the closet organizer.   The shoes can wait, I'm checking out the pretty moulding, and how it fits over the baseboard. You get me.   With the tower in the closet, I then determined where to place it.  I wanted about 2 feet on the far side for dresses and long coats, and then the remainder for two rows of hanging storage for shirts and pants. So I took a measurement, and cut and Kreg-jigged holes on top of the shelf, And then attached the shelf to the closet side. On all the studs in the walls, I attached the shelf using L brackets underneath. The shelves are just plywood, so the edges aren't the prettiest.  I can fix that!! I had the Ram also prepaint me some 1x2s, that I just cut down to size, And nailed it over the front exposed plywood edges. This also helps support the front of the shelf. And then I used 3M Wood Filler in white for filling the nail holes. Almost done - just need a few closet rods hung! These pole sockets were about $1 a set, so I opted to use them.  It's just a matter of finding where you want the closet rod to be centered, and attaching - here I attached the pole sockets first to wall cleats, And then attached the wall cleats to studs in the wall. The opposite cleat is just attached directly to the tower, And then I cut the closet rods to fit and hung them in place. Tingles, I tell you!!! Perfect for hanging shirts and pants on the left, larger side, And then just enough space on the far side for dresses and longer pieces of clothes. Hope Grandma likes it! I certainly enjoyed building it! Sending out a shout-out to my friends at 3MDIY.com for helping me keep safe while building, and helping me finish out this project with ease and collaborating with me on this post! This post is a collaboration with 3M DIY. To keep up-to-date on projects, products and sampling visit 3MDIY.com. 3M DIY Twitter Page 3M DIY Facebook Page 3M DIY YouTube Page Check out the free plans following!!! XO Ana Materials and Tools Shopping List:  1 - full sheet 3/4" plywood cut into three strips 15-3/4" wide and 8 feet long (you'll need more for additional shelving - this will only cover the tower) 1 - full sheet of 1/4" plywood (you won't need this if you do fixed shelves, but if all of your shelves are adjustable like mine, you will need the back for support) 2 - 1x2 @ 8 feet long (I used poplar) 1 - 1x4 @ 2 feet long (I used pine for my header) 1 - 2x2 @ 8 feet long 1 - 3/4" x 3/4" inside corner moudling for trimming out header (optional) about 6 feet of base moulding 1-1/4" pocket hole screws (recommended) or 2" self tapping wood screws 1 - 1/4" finish nails for attaching face frame recommend smaller nails for attaching back but you could use the 1-1/4" - just be careful when shooting them wood glue Shelf pins Plywood Edge banding and an iron Tools:  measuring tape square pencil safety glasses hearing protection Kreg Jig™ drill circular saw jigsaw nailer sander Cut List Cut List:  BOX 2 - 3/4" plywood @ 15 3/4" x 72" (sides) 6 - 3/4" plywood @ 15-3/4" x 22-1/2" (Shelves**, top and bottom) 1 - 1/4" plywood @ 24" x 72" (back) FACE FRAME 1 - 1x2 @ 24" 2 - 1x2 @ 71 1/4" 1 - 1x2 @ 21" 1 - 1x4 @ 21" BASE - Optional 4 - 2x2 @ height of baseboard 2 - 2x2 @ 21" 2 - 2x2 @ outside depth of tower MINUS baseboard depth baseboard trim cut to fit **For shelves that are adjustable with shelf pins (as mine are) you may need to trim the shelves down by 1/4" in width and depth to allow for edge banding and shelf pin spacing) Step 1 Start by building the basic box - I used my Kreg Jig with 3/4" pocket holes and 1-1/4" pocket hole screws, placing pocket holes on the outsides (top and bottom of top and bottom). Step 2 I used a shelf pin jig to drill shelf pin holes for adjustable shelves. If you do this, you will need to trim your shelves down so they fit the shelf pins (for my shelf pins this ended up being 1/4" in overall width) and also trimmed off 1/4" to allow for edge banding and easy shelf placement from the overall depth of the shelf. For fixed shelves, the shelves can be placed at any height. You will still need to do something to finish off the front plywood edges. For a painted finish, you can apply wood filler to the front plywood edge, sand, and paint. For a stained finish, edge banding is recommended (although I've seen lots of stained plywood edges on modern furniture an it's really works too!). Another option is to integrate 1x2s into the face frame that will cover the front plywood edges. Step 3 If you don't do fixed shelves, you will need a back to keep the tower from splaying out in the center. I attached my back with nails and glue. Step 4 The face frame really helps make the front look nice and finish out the front plywood edges. I built my face frame first with pocket holes, and then attached the whole thing to the front of the tower with glue and finish nails. Step 5 To bring the tower up over my baseboard, I built a quick base out of 2x2s - using 1-1/2" pocket holes and 2-1/2" pocket hole screws, and attached it to the base of the tower. Note the base is as wide as the cabinet, but not as deep to allow the tower to sit on top of the existing baseboard. Step 6 Then I trimmed out the base of the tower in matching baseboard to the closet baseboard, mitering corners and using a finish nailer and glue to attach to the 2x2 base. I also added the 3/4" x 3/4" inside corner moudling to the top header and cut the top header out with a jigsaw to add detail - but this is all just for decoration - not sturctural. Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed. May I Suggest a Finish? Rustic Yet Refined Wood Finish Antique White using Minwax Stain Marker Vintage Distressed Pink using Minwax Stain   1 of 9 ››

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