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Railing

  1. Rebuild an Old Deck With New Decking and Railings

    An old deck with a sound structure doesn't have to be torn down. You can remove the worn out decking and railing , and then replace it with new, low-maintenance decking and railing – a brand-new deck for a lot less money.

Other Projects for DIYers from The Family Handyman:

  1. Outdoor Stair Railing

    Project

    Decks and outdoor stairs can develop wobbly railings , often due to a wobbly bottom post. Here's how to do it right, without having to set the post in concrete.

  2. Safety First: Install an Outdoor Staircase Railing

    Project

    Replace a wobbly old outdoor handrail with a rock solid one by using strong concrete anchors. We show you how to design and attach one to your steps.

  3. Repairing Decks and Railings

    Project

    Easy fixes for common deck problems like rotten boards, wobbly railings and loose nails. Plus, see how to stiffen a bouncy, wobbly deck

  4. Install a New Stair Handrail

    Project

    If you have a loose stair rail, a weak stair rail or no rail at all, fix the problem by installing a solidly anchored railing like we show here. Would your stair rail hold up to three energetic youngsters hanging on it like this? If you're not sure, or if you have stairways with missing rails, now's the time to fix the problem. More accidents happen on stairways than anywhere else in the house, and a strong stair rail goes a long way toward making stairs safer and easier to use. In this article, we'll show you how to cut and assemble your rail and how to mount it solidly to the wall framing.

  5. Deck Railing Repair

    Project

    Stiffen a wobbly deck railing by adding blocks along the rim joist. It's a quick and easy way to firm up the railing .

  6. How to Build a Cedar Deck Railing With Glass

    Project

    We'll show you how to dress up a dull deck with sturdy, handsome railing that provides a wide-open view. The tinted glass is strong and safe, and it adds flair to your outdoor space. This article explains everything you need to build the railing for your deck.

  7. How to Fix Loose Stair Handrails

    Project

    Fix a wobbly railing by first attaching it to a board and then screwing the board solidly to the wall.

  8. 5 Common Building Code Violations

    Project

    Prevent accidents and make your home safer by fixing these five common code violations—bad GFCIs, an improperly located smoke alarm, an incomplete handrail , bad bathroom venting and missing deck flashing.

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Other Articles for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. Stair Railings - 14 Designs to Elevate Your Home Design - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    A stair railing is not just a safety feature. The newels, balusters, and railings of a staircase can make a real design statement and bring a sense of style to a space. Whatever your decor—contemporary, traditional, or ultramodern—there is a stair railing combination out there to match. Whether you ...

  2. Staircase Ideas - 14 Incredible Stair Railings - BobVila.com - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    A stair railing is not just a safety feature. The newels, balusters, and railings of a staircase can make a real design statement and bring a sense of style to a space. Whatever your decor—contemporary, traditional, or ultramodern—there is a stair railing combination out there to match. Whether you ...

  3. Victorian Kitchen & Bath Remodel : Installing Cedar Deck Railings - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    General contractor Tim Berky is building the cedar deck railings , first by notching the edge board to receive posts, then by fitting one post into each notch. Once assembled, he attaches sections of railing to posts by driving in screws.

  4. Bob Vila Radio: Removing Banisters

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    If you're putting off giving your front hall a facelift because re-finishing or re-painting the banister and baluster...

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Other Videos for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. How to Install Composite Deck Railing Video

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Mark Donovan of Home Addition shows how to install composite deck railing from Fiberon in this video.

  2. How to Protect Your Deck

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Cleaning and Protecting Your Deck - This video will show how to protect your deck.

  3. Deck Design Tips

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    In this video you will learn how to design a deck for your home.

  4. How to Wash a Deck

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    Cleaning and Protecting Your Deck - This video will show how to wash a deck.

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Blog Posts

  1. Stair Railing

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    Our job has turned into a desk job. Well, at least a job that you sit down at.  I guess that's the good thing about working on stairs. You get to sit on them while you work on them. Yep, sitting down on the job, figuring the stair skirts and installing them. You remember back when when we built this handrail right? Well, the railing now extends down the stairs on the inside!!! This is how we built it: Since the top post is already in, and part of the upstairs railing , all we have to do is place the bottom post. We left it long, as we'll be cutting off the top at an angle so the railing can run over top of it. This looks like a simple step, but we actually spent quite a bit of time making sure this post was installed plumb and square, and well attached between the stairs and to the landing below. With the post in place, we then start figuring the top board in the railing . This takes some thought, because we have to make sure the railing runs parallel to the stairs all the way down. The top is clamped to the upstairs railing . We adjusted so that where the top is clamped to the upstairs railing (leading nose of the top tread) it's measured up exactly the same on the bottom (leading nose of the bottom tread). Once the top railing is fitted in place and we are happy with it, We go and scribe the boards (just draw lines on the boards and cut with a circular saw). We also marked the post at an angle so we can chop the top off as well in later steps. Then we take the scribed boards and drill pocket holes in the ends and attach to the posts and top railing . We've also got the bottom post in here too. Now time to double check the spacing in between. We cut a board at the angles of the top and bottom, to the distance between, and check to see if it fits in perfectly at the center. Then we double check again at the bottom ... He's starting to feel like Aaron Rodgers here ... but really, you can't double check enough when you are building - especially a custom built don't-want-to-do-this-twice stair railing . Oh, yeah, we have the other side of the Momplex to do, too, don't we? When we are finally happy with the main railing boards, it's time to add the balusters. I've figured how many we need, and it's an odd number, so we'll start with a baluster in the center. So we find the center of the railing boards, And mark it, And fit our first baluster in at the center. We've used our Kreg Jig to drill pocket holes in the ends of all the balusters, so we can just line up the center on the baluster with the center of the railing board, And attach with pocket hole screws and glue. Same is done with the top,  And then it's double check time again.   I know this seems like overkill, but all of the balusters installed from this one out depend on the first one being level.  So getting this first one perfect is crucial. Then we use blocking to space the next baluster, to code distance (for us, a little less than 4") away from the first middle baluster. That baluster gets glued 'n screwed in place. We keep the same spacing at the top too, using the precut spacing blocks. Once we got rolling - or should I say " railing " - this part went really fast.  Once the balusters above the center one were attached, we went back and attached the balusters below the center.  Of course we double checked each and every baluster to make sure it was level.   Of course. This railing is getting painted like the rest, but we still need to fill those pocket holes.  So we set wood plugs in all the pocket holes with glue. To keep the balusters from twisting out and give the railing similar styling to the upstairs railing , we glued and nailed a few trim boards on the outsides over the balusters, And then our helper got home from school and helped us attach the top to the railing , like we did on the main railing .  This finishes out the top edge. Then we unattached the entire railing and filled, sanded and finished it, and reattached it ... And it's done!!! We will next finish off the treads and risers, and we may go back and add a stained board on top to match the stained treads, but for now, the railing is double checked and done! Whew, I tell you, kitchen cabinets are going to be a breeze after this project! read more

  2. Balustrade Coffee Table

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    DIY baluster coffee table plans from ana-white.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  Hello DIY Friends and Happy Monday! Pretty excited to share a brand new plan with you today! My good friend Jen from House of Wood asked me to team up with her to build her parents a new coffee table.  She loved the look of Restoration Hardware's Balustrade Coffee Table , and wanted to use a similar style leg. The folks at Osborne Wood were kind enough to create a custom leg (now available for sale) and worked with us to make the leg as affordable as possible.  Leg available here. Just add a top and bottom ... And you've got yourself a beautiful custom coffee table! Jen did an amazing job building this coffee table.   Here's from Jen: "It was an easy build… took about 6 hours to build and then 3 days to finish. It turned out really well! Total cost was $95 for lumber and supplies, plus $28/leg. Not a bad project for a couple hundred bucks! Especially when RH sells theirs for $1700." Jen loves her coffee table so much, she's already working on another one for herself! Jen is sharing her building post here, so please, take a second and stop over and check out lots more photos and tips! Thanks Jen! Plans follow. XO Ana + Family Materials and Tools Shopping List:  5 - 1x6 @ 6 feet long 4 - 2x4 @ 8 feet long 1 - 1x4 @ 15” long 4 - 2x6 @ 8 feet or stud length 4 - turned pillars ( Jen used these from Osborne Wood ) 1-1/4” and 2-1/2” pocket hole screws 2” or longer wood screws nails for nailing on feet Tools:  measuring tape square pencil safety glasses hearing protection Kreg Jig™ drill circular saw nailer sander Cut List Cut List:  10 - 1x6 @ 33” long 2 - 2x4 @ 33” long 2 - 2x4 @ 48” long (may need to be cut to fit) 4 - 1x4 @ 3-1/2” long 8 - 2x6 @ 5-1/2” long 2 - 2x4 @ 20” long 2 - 2x4 @ 42” (may need to be cut to fit) 2 - 2x6 @ 33” long 6 - 2x6 @ 44” long Step 1 Start by building the bottom shelf with pocket holes. TIP: I like to cut all my shelf boards a tad long, then join the boards and trim down the tabletop with a circular saw. After building it, take a second to measure the size of the shelf (1x6 boards can vary in width) - so you may need to adjust some of your cuts or cut as you go. NOTE: You may wish to attach legs (step 5) before moving on to hide screw holes underneath. Step 2 Frame up the bottom supports and attach to bottom shelf. Step 3 Nail and glue the feet on at the bottom shelf corners. You can use 1-1/4" - 2" long nails. Step 4 Attach the 2x6 blocks to the tops and bottoms of the legs. Step 5 Attach legs to bottom shelf with screws. Step 6 Attach legs together with pocket holes placed on top. Step 7 Build the tabletop first, then attach to top of coffee table through the boards added in step 6 and legs. Step 8 For finishing details and building photos, please visit Jen at House of Wood. Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

  3. Wood Handrail Plans

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    How to DIY a wood handrail - free plans from Ana-White.com About Project Author Notes:  Thank you all for your wonderful comments and feedback on our new handrail for Momplex : Unit Sewing Mom.  We appreciate your encouragement! The handrail turned out so well, we have to share the plans with you - as promised! Now before you start building a handrail , make sure you check with your local building codes to build your handrail to meet codes.  We've built ours to meet our codes, but your's could differs - so adjust accordingly. The first step is to measure and plan your handrail accorddingly.  We placed our handrail on top of the top edge of the drywall in the entryway, to finish off that edge, and will also be adding additional trim later on. If you are adding a stair handrail , also consider how you will be attaching it - We'll be posting about a stair handrail in the next few weeks as well. Consider how you will attach the handrail to the floor/walls.  We built the Momplex, so we know exactly what is under the floor - so we opted for a floor mounted handrail .  Alternatively, the handrail could have been mounted on the wall - but that's a different design and plan. If your handrail is longer than 6 feet, you'll need center posts as well - like we did here: I'm big on symmetry, so I like to place the post in the center for balance - something you may wish to figure in your design as well. Also, if you haven't already, please take a second to read through our building a handrail post - there's lots of pictures and details on how we built ours that will come in handy if you are DIYing a handrail .

  4. Maintaining Aluminum Railings

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

    Many folks these days have chose to use aluminum railings for the entry ways, decks and balconies as opposed to traditional wood or iron railings .  The attraction to theirs railings is usually based... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

  5. Stainless Steel Cable and Wood Railing

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    Hi everyone!  Happy Friday! Do you remember back when we built this railing for Momplex Unit B? We absolutely LOVE how it turned out.  And we love that not only does it protect the stair opening, but it's so substantial, it's almost like a long console table that you can lean on. read more

  6. Adding A Handrail Support

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

     

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