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Carpentry

  1. The Best Carpentry Tips and Advice

    We asked professional carpenters to pass along some of the tricks and tips they've learned after years of pounding thousands of nails into just about anything made of wood. Read the following tips to benefit from their hardworking carpentry experiences.

Other Projects for DIYers from The Family Handyman:

  1. Top Trim Carpentry Tools

    Project

    Pro-quality finish work is a lot easier with the right tools—and they don't have to be expensive. Check out a master carpenter's list of must-have hand and power tools.

  2. Shortcuts for Trim Carpenters

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    Learn better ways to cut and install casing, baseboard and crown molding, tricks for hanging doors and avoiding bad transitions, and other secrets of the trim carpentry profession.

  3. Finish Carpentry Tips

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    Uneven walls, floors and corners are common problems in finish carpentry . These tips from veteran carpenters will show you time-tested solutions.

  4. Interior Trim Work Basics

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    We show you how to make crisp, sharp corners and tight joints when installing door trim, window trim and a three-piece baseboard. With a few basic carpentry tools and a little patience, you can trim out a room in a weekend. With a little practice you can master the two key trim techniques, mitering ...

  5. How to Use a Laser Level

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    Do you think that laser levels are a bit of a gimmick? Try one and we bet you will be reaching for one more and more often for all kinds of carpentry tasks. Here are a few tips to help you get started using laser levels.

  6. Woodworking Jig For Complex Shapes

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    Need to reproduce a complex shape for your carpentry project? With a tick stick you can easily make perfect templates for cutting irregular angles and curves.

  7. Maximize Your Sawhorses

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    Sawhorses can do much more than just hold up a piece of plywood. Even experienced carpenters will learn new tricks with these time-tested pro tips.

  8. How to Install Window Trim

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    Most trim carpenters don't even use a tape to trim windows. It's all done by eye, with a sharp pencil, a miter saw and an 18-gauge nailer. Here's how they do it.

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Other Articles for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. Using Wood Plugs - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    By using wood plugs, you can conceal the fasteners that are holding together your carpentry project.

  2. Bob Vila Radio: Dowel Joinery Tips

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    Here’s a technique professional carpenters use to conceal screws in fine woodworking projects: use wooden plugs. List...

  3. Carpenter's Squares - Bob Vila Radio - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    When you need to create accurate angles as part of a home improvement project, there's no substitute for the trusty carpenter's square.

  4. Room Transformation - Before & After - Bob Vila

    Article

    FromBobVila.com

    DIY bloggers are a talented bunch. Skilled in carpentry , styling, and social media, they constantly challenge themselves with home makeover projects that last anywhere from a weekend to weeks—or even a year. From choosing paint colors to laying tile, adding wainscoting to breaking down walls, these ...

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Other Videos for DIYers from Around the Web

  1. How to Use a Framing Square

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    You don't have to be a professional carpenter to use a framing square. Even if you're a carpentry hobbyist, the tool can come in handy.

  2. How to Mark a Board

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    The Family Handyman carpentry expert, Mark Petersen, will show you how to properly mark a board before cutting it on a miter saw.

  3. How to Build a Miter Saw Table

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    The Family Handyman carpentry expert, Mark Petersen, will show you how to get more efficient use out of your miter saw by building your own miter saw table.

  4. How to Set Up a Stop Block for Your Miter Saw

    Video

    TFH Multi Playlist Videos

    If you have several identical cuts to make, a stop block will make it go a lot quicker. The Family Handyman carpentry expert, Mark Petersen, will show you how to set up a stop block for your miter saw to save you time.

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Blog Posts

  1. DEWALT Carpentry Quick Check

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

    DEWALT Building Code Reference Books My crew and I recently stumbled on two building code reference books called DEWALT Carpentry Quick Check Extreme Duty Edition and Building code Reference.... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

  2. Tight Fitting Miters

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

     

  3. Cedar Vertical Tiered Ladder Garden Planter

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    build your own ladder garden planter - free plans from ana-white.com Follow Ana on Pinterest! About Project Author Notes:  Hi everyone! Do you remember my friend Jen, who built this planter last week? Jen is a beginning builder, and will be working with me on beginner projects that are less expensive, easy, but still tons of fun! We are both so excited to debut a brand new plan today - a vertical garden ladder planter!  It's perfect for small backyards or even a tiny patio or balcony.  Even if you live in a small apartment in the city, you can still get your garden on! The total cost of this planter ladder was about $20 - compared to $239 for this one with just three tiers! I've asked Jen to share her tips and challenges as she built this tiered ladder planter - here's from Jen: ---- After the last project I couldn't wait to get started on this one. Another simple build with great results! What I like about this is it could be used as a regular flower planter, an herb planter, or as I did with herbs and flowers to mix it up a little. I got right to work and got all cuts done and layed out. Then I started attaching with the handy Ryobi AirStrike staple gun. Did I mention I love that thing! I'm pretty sure it's my new best friend - quick and easy, that's how I like it! The compound miter saw is great for the angled cuts. I needed 10 of the end pieces at 15 degrees off square, not parallel. Instead of adjusting the miter from side to side I simply made my first end cut, then used it as a template to mark the rest of the boards as I cut. Then all I needed to do instead of adjusting the saw is flip the board each time I cut. It worked much better than how I invisioned it would in my head. Once I had all the end pieces cut, I attached them to the sides with the staple gun.  After that I measured my opening and cut the bottom pieces as I went I shoved them in from the top, and there were my five boxes done. I shot a few staples for extra hold on the bottom pieces from the outside of each box. Now for the frame. I was a little intimidated by the top cut, but my saw was already set to 15 degrees, so I just wacked the ends off parallel as directed in the cut list. Then I used a carpenters square to cut the back off the tops, perpendicular to the 15 degree top cut.  It sounds complicated but it actually is easy.  TIP: If you don't have a carpenter's square, just use a scrap of wood or even a hardcover book. I didn't have a circular saw, so decided to use the jig saw to cut this part. I haven't really used a jig saw before, but all and all it went pretty well. I just took my time and was sure to stay on the outside edge of the line I had drawn. I won't like, the first cut wasn't perfect, but it worked. After the first upright was cut, I used it to trace the line on the second board. Then, once again, used the jig saw to cut on the traced line. This time it went even better. Practice makes perfect! Now came the time to attach the boxes to the frame. I started from the top and worked my way down. I marked my starting point on both uprights at the same time for consistency.  Then I screwed the box to one leg from the inside of the box, then placed the other leg and did the same.  First box down! Now I had a starting point for the rest of the boxes. So I cut a spacer at 6 inches (see photo below) to make the placing easier. Be sure to keep the spacer at an angle to follow the line of the first box attached. Once I had it placed I screwed the second box from the inside of the box to the frame, and so on and so forth with the rest of the boxes.  It made it easier to turn the frame on its side to place the screws. Clamps are your friend here if you don't have an extra hand. Now all I had to do was stand it up, and there was the finished product, a beautiful versatile vertical planter! Be sure to drill holes in the bottom of each box to allow for drainage. I drilled after it was all attached, but you could do it after building the boxes before attaching them to the frame. Now it was time to plant it! I showed my mother-in-law the planter and she loved it, so I decided it would look great in her back yard.  So off we went to get some flowers and herbs.  Turned out pretty well if you ask me! It's amazing what you can build with $20 bucks in lumber in a couple of hours! I hope you have as much fun building this as I did! --- Thanks Jen!  Of course, plans follow - please share your finished planter with us if you build!!! XO Ana + Family Materials and Tools Shopping List:  5 - 5-1/2" wide cedar fence pickets (dogeared is fine) 72" length 2 - 10' long 2x6 20 - 2-1/2" long exterior decking screws (for attaching boxes to legs) 1-1/4" galvanized nails or staples (for making boxes) Tools:  measuring tape square pencil safety glasses hearing protection drill jigsaw compound miter saw staple gun Cut List Cut List:  10 - 2x6 @ 5-1/4" both ends cut at 15 degrees off square, ends are NOT parallel 10 - 5-1/2" wide cedar fence pickets @ 23-1/2" 5 - 5-1/2" wide cedar fence pickets @ 20-1/2" (cut to fit) 2 - 2x6 @ 68-3/8" both ends cut at 15 degrees off square, ends ARE parallel Step 1 Attach two of the longer cedar fence picket pieces to two ends. I used 1-1/4" galvanized staples, but you could also use screws or nails. Step 2 I placed the bottoms in from the top, and then added a few staples to keep them in place. Step 3 The sides are simply cut with ends parallel at 15 degrees, then the back is cut off perpendicular to the top 15 degree cut. It's easier than you'd think. I used a jigsaw but the right tool would have been a circular saw. Start your cut on the top as you will have more to bit into. Step 4 Mark the placement of the top planter on both legs first to make sure you place the planter in exactly the same spot on both legs. Then I attached from inside with 2-1/2" exterior decking screws. The 2x6s I used were very hard to drill into, so I ended up predrilling as well. Step 5 Then I used the spacer block (just a scrap piece of wood) cut at 6" long to help me space the planters as I attached them. Finishing Instructions Preparation Instructions:  Fill all holes with wood filler and let dry. Apply additional coats of wood filler as needed. When wood filler is completely dry, sand the project in the direction of the wood grain with 120 grit sandpaper. Vacuum sanded project to remove sanding residue. Remove all sanding residue on work surfaces as well. Wipe project clean with damp cloth. It is always recommended to apply a test coat on a hidden area or scrap piece to ensure color evenness and adhesion. Use primer or wood conditioner as needed.

  4. Stair Skirts

    Blog

    FromAna-White.com

    Well, here's a first. I'm going to show you how a carpenter makes a skirt. And yes, it's a pretty skirt. To be worn by the stairs. So why do stairs need a skirt? Well they don't really - you could run your baseboard down each riser, over each tread, mitering each corner, cursing any bullnoses. You could. But it would be a ton of extra work and look really busy. So our solution is to cut a skirt that will slide between the wall and the stairs, that has a straight edge on top. That way our baseboard can just continue from the upstairs, right down the top of the skirt, around the landing, down the second flight of stairs, and on to the lower level. Since the skirt is part of the trimming, we want to go from finished floor to finished floor heights. So we floored the landing area - the same as the upstairs. Then we took a 1x12 board, a few feet longer than the flight, and rested it on top of the stairs. Notice the board is resting on top of the leading edge of each of the treads, and brought down to touch the landing floor. Then we determined how far we want the skirt to go past the stairs. I choose 4" for our stairs. Enough to give an even reveal of the skirt around the stairs, and still leave enough room for the baseboard to make the end corner. So from this distance, use a level to mark a straight line vertically near the bottom end of the skirt board. This line gets cut with a circular saw. The top meets the top landing and for us, it worked out flush to the wall. Again, a level is used to mark the top and this mark is cut off with a circular saw. With the top and bottoms cut, this allows the skirt to drop down between the stairs and the wall. But for us, it doesn't drop down enough, and a tiny corner of wall shows at the inside corner of each stair. What to do? We trim the bottom edge of the skirt, square to the level end cut off, to bring the entire skirt down. It looks like the skirt needs to be brought down more in this photo, but that's just the angle of this photo. Once we were happy with the height of the skirt, we then need to go back and trim the top edge of the skirt off flush with the finished upstairs floor to allow the baseboard to make the corner from the hallway and down the skirt. This gets marked with a level, and cut off with a circular saw. That's one skirt done! And you can see, our baseboard will now just run from the upstairs, around the corner, down the skirt, then around the landing and continue on. (I'll show you how we do that in a later post). With the skirts cut just right, we then removed them and sanded and painted them on sawhorses. Much easier. And then repositioned the skirt between the stairs and the wall and nailed it in place to studs in the wall. And that's how carpenters make skirts!

  5. Decorating With Flowers

    Blog

    FromA Concord Carpenter

    Decorate your Home With Flowers From Your Own Garden Carpenters don’t really care about decorating with flowers. As a carpenter my thoughts and plans often revolve around details and ideas that... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]

  6. Hardcore Hammers and Hatchets: American Made Tools

    Blog

    FromCharles and Hudson

    If you value American designed and manufactured tools then you'll love Hardcore Hammers. It's difficult for anyone to break into the tool business, much less two carpenters , but brothers Steve and Rick had an idea for a new type of framing hammer and in a year they had designed and developed a ...

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