How to Repair a Cut Extension Cord

All you need is a new plug

If you accidentally cut your extension cord or power tool cord, save it by adding a new plug and receptacle to the two pieces—a safer solution than a splice.

By the DIY experts of The Family Handyman Magazine

Fix for a damaged cord

Accidentally cut your good, heavy-duty extension cord? Replacement cords are expensive, and you can save money by just repairing it.

Technically, you’re not supposed to splice extension cords. Even if you solder the wires, wrap each wire with electrical tape and encase the whole splice in heat shrinkable tubing, it still won’t have the abrasion resistance of a new cord. Plus, it’s not permissible under the National Electrical Code.

Instead, if both sections are long enough to be worth saving, just buy a high-quality plug and receptacle and make two cords out of one. Be sure the new ends are rated to carry the same load as the old cord and that both have built-in strain relief clamps. Otherwise, just buy one end and accept the fact that your 100-ft. cord is now only 92.56 ft.

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Required Tools for this Project

Have the necessary tools for this DIY project lined up before you start—you’ll save time and frustration.

  • 4-in-1 screwdriver
  • Electrical tape
  • Needle-nose pliers
  • Utility knife
  • Wire stripper/cutter

Required Materials for this Project

Avoid last-minute shopping trips by having all your materials ready ahead of time. Here's a list.

  • Heavy-duty replacement plug with strain relief clamp
  • Heavy-duty replacement receptacle with strain relief clamp