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December 22, 11:12 AM [GMT -5]

This is great stuff. I do trim work a lot and was pleased to see that I do most of this already. I thought I was the only one who pinned the corners and smashed the drywall. Haha. (I figured these out myself) I did pick up a couple great tips though that will come in helpful. I've always been too lazy to change out the brad lengths in my gun for the frame vs. the wall, but I've punched the 2 inchers through the frame enough times (which takes way more time to fix than changing the nails back and forth) to make me finally do it. Great story!

June 08, 3:04 PM [GMT -5]

Thats fine with painted trim but what about stained wood trim like oak or cherry. is that accepteble to calk in these situations.

June 07, 8:45 PM [GMT -5]

How are you pinning the inside edge of the trim?
Elvie

June 06, 7:34 PM [GMT -5]

you do not mention anywhere in this article about the use of cdarpenter's wood glue. ALL miters, whether they are window and door casing, or baseboard outside corners, should have a layer of wood glue spread on both halves before fastening takes place. then the excess should be wiped clean with a damp rag.

March 17, 4:51 PM [GMT -5]

best I have seen yet.

March 15, 12:44 AM [GMT -5]

Great tips--even a few new to me!

February 18, 7:31 PM [GMT -5]

Don't you guys glue the joints?

February 17, 7:42 PM [GMT -5]

I also find it handy when cutting trim at a wall or ceiling that requires two pieces because of the length, to cut them together with a 45. That way the splice matches perfectly.

February 17, 7:34 PM [GMT -5]

Just wish I could remember all these great tips!

February 16, 2:55 PM [GMT -5]

One of the best tips I received regards this tipe of tasks

February 16, 1:06 PM [GMT -5]

When trying to perfectly match miters, I prefer to use a scrap of trim to test the fit and make adjustments on the scrap until the fit is like I want it. Then I cut the 'real' miter. One piece of scrap cut on both ends will suffice. Just be sure it is long enough to fit to the miter saw fence properly.
Forrest

February 16, 1:05 PM [GMT -5]

I always cut long and walk into the right correct length. I cut all my long boards first and tack them in, this way I don't have to seem together a long run later. then I walk into the correct angles on the scrap pieces. It is time consuming, but for a novice, my baseboards came out great! I also take the time to measure, and layout each and every cut so that i know how much scrap i will have. Also, you know if you need more molding before the project starts. Definitely helps eliminate the need to run out when you have 1 cut to go!

February 16, 10:54 AM [GMT -5]

When doing ceiling and base boards where bevel cuts are necessary, I found it helpful to come up with my own terminology to help me remember which way the bevel needs to go. So I labeled an inside corner cut "open" and an outside corner type cut "closed." That way when I'm moving from the room to the garage I walk away being able to say to myself "right side open, left side closed" as I get to the garage to cut. Because let's face it, we've all wasted an 8 foot piece by cutting the angle the wrong direction on accident.

February 16, 10:54 AM [GMT -5]

When doing ceiling and base boards where bevel cuts are necessary, I found it helpful to come up with my own terminology to help me remember which way the bevel needs to go. So I labeled an inside corner cut "open" and an outside corner type cut "closed." That way when I'm moving from the room to the garage I walk away being able to say to myself "right side open, left side closed" as I get to the garage to cut. Because let's face it, we've all wasted an 8 foot piece by cutting the angle the wrong direction on accident.

February 16, 8:37 AM [GMT -5]

These are tips worth keeping and using.

February 16, 8:00 AM [GMT -5]

To find the perfect fit for a second piece which will butt into a 45 degree joint, cut a short piece of scrap to fit into the angled joint. When the fit is perfect, THEN use that saw setting for the longer piece to be installed. Also, If one of the facings has a 45 degree cut and the other end is a 90, then cut the piece a wee bit long and do all the trimming on the square end. It takes a little more time, but I found that no fillers were needed afterward.

September 10, 9:02 PM [GMT -5]

These are great tips, especially for the novice woodworker!!

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Tips for Tight Miters and Miter Cuts

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